Search Results: "Fred Hiatt"


BOOK REVIEW

BABY TALK by Fred Hiatt
Released: May 1, 1999

"A blend of delicate hues and deep jewel tones suffused by a gentle light lends an ethereal quality to the images. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Importuned by the incomprehensible cries of his baby brother, Joey turns to his other family members to decipher their meaning, preferring the role of an observer in the daily care of his sibling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET SUN by Fred Hiatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 8, 1992

"An impressive debut from a writer who can paint the Japanese as a threat without obscuring his own critical affection for the people and their culture."
This debut novel by a former Washington Post Tokyo bureau chief offers an engaging hero, an unlikely but at least possible scenario, and manages to play upon American fears about increasing Japanese economic domination without engaging in some of the gratuitous Japan-bashing that's become so popular. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NINE DAYS by Fred Hiatt
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 9, 2013

"This engaging mix will have great appeal to middle school readers in search of adventure; the geopolitical education is a nice bonus. (Thriller. 11-16)"
Human rights abuses in China get all too personal for a couple of American high school students in this appealing thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMAGINARY FRED by Eoin Colfer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Not the solidest piece in the looking-for-a-friend genre. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An imaginary person has needs of his own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRED & EDIE by Jill Dawson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A riveting story, not so much because of its tragic dimensions, but because of the remarkable degree to which Edie rises from the page to tell her tortured tale. Can the movie version, to be released here this year, compare?
"
A third novel from British poet and editor Dawson (the YA How Do I Look, 1991, etc.), shortlisted for the 2000 Whitbread and Orange Prizes and already a bestseller in the UK (30,000 copies thus far), works history and fiction seamlessly together in a complicated story of passion and murder that caused a sensation in England in 1922. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRED FORGETS by Jarvis
by Jarvis, illustrated by Jarvis
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 7, 2016

"Humorous but mean-spirited, this story about clever mind control that is only stopped by brute force is an unnecessary addition to the picture-book shelf. (Picture book. 4-6)"
An impish monkey gets a comeuppance when pal Fred wakes up to some not-so-subtle mental bullying. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIREMAN FRED  by Lynn Rowe Reed
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"While the vocabulary is certainly easy and limited (alone and chief are the two hardest words), beginning readers will have heard enough stories about firefighters to spot the problems. (Early reader. 4-6)"
A title for beginning readers, this entry in the I Like to Read series follows Fireman Fred from the firehouse, out on a call and back again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOLA AND FRED by Christoph “Pül” Heuer
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2006

"A sequel is in the offing. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Two earthbound buddies—a turtle and a frog, respectively—decide to take up flying in this wordless Swiss import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY FRIEND FRED by Hiawyn Oram
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"It's a doggone shame that didacticism mars the depiction of a young owner's relationship with her beloved pup. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A young girl shares a special bond with Fred, her family's pooch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRED STAYS WITH ME! by Nancy Coffelt
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2007

"A gem. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The word "divorce" is never uttered in this charming story of a young girl who sometimes lives with her mom, and sometimes with her dad, but who never leaves the side of her affable dog Fred. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACK AND FRED by Byron Barton
Released: Sept. 23, 1974

"Barton uses all the limitations of primary school artwork — distorted proportion, identical facial expressions, exaggerated postures — to create a slaphappy mood, and humans can laugh at Fred and Jack's little joke — wondering all the while who is deceiving whom."
The family of Jack (the rabbit) is drawn with mock-first grade naivete — as a not very human conglomerate of wavery ovoids and doodled faces. Read full book review >