Search Results: "Fred Pearce"


BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW WILD by Fred Pearce
NON-FICTION
Released: April 7, 2015

"Pearce's book could use some pruning and shaping of its own, but his theme is significant: There is no going back when change is the norm."
Environmental journalist Pearce (The Land Grabbers: The New Fight over Who Owns the Earth, 2012, etc.) examines the effects of introduced species and our responses to them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"An able exposition of many of the ugly realities behind the global marketplace's attractive exterior."
New Scientist environment and development consultant Pearce (With Speed and Violence: Why Scientists Fear Tipping Points in Climate Change, 2007, etc.) looks at the stuff our consumer dreams are made of, drawing dire conclusions about globalization along the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 7, 2007

"Important reading for policymakers, climate-change skeptics and anyone planning a future beyond the next decade."
Well-documented and terrifying review of the scientific evidence supporting claims that Earth teeters on the edge of a climactic precipice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 29, 2012

"A well-researched, informative and accessible look at important economic and agricultural issues."
New Scientist environmental and development consultant Pearce (The Coming Population Crash, 2010, etc.) documents widespread global "land grabs" by moneyed interests and the dire consequences for poor people around the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2010

"Consistently interesting, informative and inspiring reporting."
A veteran environmental journalist peeks into the future and reports some surprisingly good news. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PHOENIX RISING by Bryony Pearce
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Thrilling steamship adventure overcomes wobbly worldbuilding. (Science fiction. 12-14)"
A pirate ship plies the garbage-strewn and poisonous seas of a late 21st century finally recovering from the eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAMEL OF DESTRUCTION by Michael Pearce
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Rife with subterfuge, political intrigue, and state-of-the-art business chicanery, circa 1910, with dozens of sly asides and a glimpse of Egypt so pungent you can almost smell the camel dung."
When Gareth Cadwallader Owen, the Mamur Zapt of colonial Cairo, reaches into his in-box and pulls out the Widow Shawquat's petition that her husband's property be passed on to her son instead of to the distant relative who wants to sell the land out from under them, Owen politely tries to fend her off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DEAD MAN IN MALTA by Michael Pearce
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"An amusing period tale. Seymour's seventh outing (Dead in Naples, 2009, etc.) shows a dry wit and an engaging touch with political folderol, familial brouhahas and mystery logistics."
Do-good ladies and do-bad gents discombobulate 1913 Malta. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BRIDE BOX by Michael Pearce
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"As always in this comically understated series (The Mark of the Pasha, 2008, etc.), both crime and punishment are consistently upstaged by a lovingly detailed portrait of Egypt during the Great War. The result is a bit like a police procedural reimagined by Douglas Adams."
One young woman lost and another found are the keys to the Mamur Zapt's latest adventure in 1913 Egypt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEETLY by Jackson Pearce
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 23, 2011

"Not Pearce's best. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
An uneven retelling of "Hansel and Gretel" swaps witches for werewolves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAY TO SATTIN SHORE by Philippa Pearce
Released: April 9, 1984

"The mystery is a cover, of sorts, for emotional and psychological baring that would otherwise be too much."
Here is Kate Tranter coming home from school in the January dusk—the first to come, because she is the youngest of her family." Read full book review >