Search Results: "Fred Waitzkin"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DREAM MERCHANT by Fred Waitzkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 26, 2013

"Thoroughly entertaining. Deeply imaginative. Highly recommended."
Waitzkin (The Last Marlin, 2000, etc.) dissects the life of a man who sells himself and other things, sprinkling the narrative with yachts, trophy homes and a cameo by Lenny Bruce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 11, 1993

"Stay tuned—and hope that Waitzkin is there to cover it."
Colorful combinations by Waitzkin (Searching for Bobby Fisher, 1988) as he castles through the manic world of grandmaster chess. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAST AWAY ON THE LETTER A by Fred
Kirkus Star
by Fred, illustrated by Fred, translated by Richard Kutner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Not since Carroll's Alice has there been such a marvelous and incredible adventure. (visual glossary, index, maps) (Graphic fantasy. 7-12)
"
A charming French import first published in 1972 and now translated into English for the first time about a boy who falls down a well and finds himself in a strange, whimsical world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPER JUMBO by Fred Koehler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Broadly entertaining. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A small elephant's superhero ambitions leave unintended chaos wherever he goes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUSPENDED CASTLE by Fred
by Fred, illustrated by Fred, translated by Richard Kutner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"While the whimsy and wonder run high, the narrative contrivances intrude more than in its predecessors. (Graphic fantasy. 7-12)"
Philemon is back on—or rather in—the map with his friend Mr. Bartholomew, where they must help more peculiar inhabitants of the nonsensical map-world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY TALK by Fred Hiatt
Released: May 1, 1999

"A blend of delicate hues and deep jewel tones suffused by a gentle light lends an ethereal quality to the images. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Importuned by the incomprehensible cries of his baby brother, Joey turns to his other family members to decipher their meaning, preferring the role of an observer in the daily care of his sibling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 26, 1990

Powledge (Fat of the Land, 1984; Water, 1982, etc.) covered the civil-rights movement as a reporter for both the New York Times and the Atlanta Journal, and he recaps it here from its first tentative beginnings after WW II to the triumphant march in 1965 from Selma to Montgomery, which signalled an end to segregation and the terrorizing of African-Americans in the South. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK GOLD by Fred Bean
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The climactic action scenes are well constructed, and the dialogue, though often repetitive, is natural and true to the time and place."
Although a bit too enamored of the traditions and myths surrounding the Texas Rangers, Bean (Lorena, not reviewed, etc.) does a commendable job in this action-filled adventure set in the East Texas oil fields in the 1930s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOODLINES by Fred D’Aguiar
Released: July 25, 2001

"In equal parts passionate and stylistically confined, an ambitious effort that never quite soars beyond its method."
After Dear Future (1996), D'Aguiar exhibits a decline—of execution, not passion—in this verse-novel about a black-white love affair in the slave world of the Civil War era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 1997

"Siegel's arguments have as many loose ends as urban America has problems, but there is no shortage of ideas to ponder."
A partisan yet sometimes penetrating analysis of urban America's decline. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Then came the economic bust, and Moody unveils a Seattle true to itself, a city that 'always finds a way to knock itself off the perch of pretension it ascends every few decades or so.'"
Seattle's reputation as an agnostically enlightened outpost—anti-establishment, anti-materialist, anti-upward-mobility, a laid-back and civil burg with an economy designed for people with no measurable drive—has been severely tested over the past two decades. Read full book review >