Search Results: "Frederick Dillen"


BOOK REVIEW

BEAUTY by Frederick Dillen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 4, 2014

"Kudos to Dillen for his unusual premise. The workplace drama that follows is rousing, if predictable."
After a career closing factories, a woman reclaims her blue-collar roots, revives a plant and saves a community. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOL by Frederick G. Dillen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1999

"A well-written tale of comic sensibility, sturdily but plainly plotted, with enough skew in it to make things unpredictable, if not quite compelling, for the reader. (First serial to Harper's)"
Dillen's second novel (Hero, 1994) is an eccentrically narrated, riches-to-rags story of the spiritual redemption of a fast-talker, wheeler-dealer, and, yes, fool. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAVELAND by Frederick Barthelme
Released: April 7, 2009

The Mississippi Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Katrina provides the backdrop for a man in hell, in Barthelme's latest novel (Elroy Nights, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAINTED DESERT by Frederick Barthelme
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A road novel that almost gets there."
A zeitgeisty novelist and storywriter hitchhikes on the info highway, only to endorse a decidedly low-tech, retro view of hope and redemption. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SABBATICAL by Frederick Pinto
Released: July 6, 2012

"A surprisingly complex novel about music and self-evaluation."
A key player in the music industry finds himself ousted and forced to reconsider his place in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCONE ISLAND by Frederick Ramsay
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"The latest mystery-thriller for Ike (Rogue, 2011, etc.) provides all the fast-paced action and danger readers have come to expect."
An eagerly awaited vacation on a quiet Maine island becomes a nightmare for a former CIA agent and his significant other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Poker-faced as it is, Libby's memoir makes for a striking period piece—from the high plains of the American West to the blue skies shared with Baron von Richtofen. (8 b&w photos, not seen)"
A reticent yet sharply impressed memoir of a turn-of-the-century cowpuncher who enlisted in the Canadian Royal Flying Corps and was decorated for valor in WWI. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAW OF AVERAGES by Frederick Barthelme
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

Some contemporary short-story writers create a sense of ennui by dispensing with plot; generous Barthelme often spins out more events in an opening paragraph than you'd expect from a whole story, then goes right on spinning till his people are tangled in a world so thick with incident that their lives seem spun even more hauntingly out of control. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEXIA by Frederick Malphurs
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 2, 2009

"Excellent characterization and a slice-of-life Texas setting help the reader ignore the novel's flaws."
Malphurs' (Meanie Mouse Versus the Orlando Operators, 2009, etc.) newest offering is a fictional memoir, firmly grounded in historical fact. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DECEIVER by Frederick Forsyth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Not a sizzler like The Day of the Jackal or even The Negotiator (1989) but more resonant than either, with shades of le CarrÇ and Deighton: sophisticated, shrewd, roundly satisfying spy- stuff. (Book-of-the-Month Split Main Selection for November)"
Forsyth's stalwart tribute to the spies who came in from the cold: four thriller-novellas featuring the intrigues of British superagent Sam McCready. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KINDER GARDEN by Frederick Taylor
Released: June 3, 1991

"A fascinating, but flawed, thriller."
British novelist and translator Taylor (Walking Shadows, 1985) returns with an evocative tale set in the rubble of postwar Berlin, just as the Soviet blockade and the Allied airlift begin. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 24, 1992

In essays that appeared mostly in The New York Review of Books, veteran critic Crews sets out to rescue major American authors through common-sense and empirical readings in an evenhanded but firm indictment of current academic ideologues and lit-crit theorists. ``My discussions of American novelists and their professor- critics will show that even within the theory-saturated academy, truly liberal criticism still exists,'' Crews declares; and, severing himself from ``conservative'' critics like Allan Bloom and Roger Kimball, he sets down what might be his own real credo: ``I want keen debate, not reverence for great books.'' And keen debate he provides, albeit not always along with the easiest of reading. Read full book review >