Search Results: "Frederick L. Malphurs"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 19, 2012

"An intricate, action-filled, spy novel that moves at breakneck speed."
The names and the locales have changed, but the intelligence game remains the same in Malphurs' over-the-top techno-thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEXIA by Frederick Malphurs
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 2, 2009

"Excellent characterization and a slice-of-life Texas setting help the reader ignore the novel's flaws."
Malphurs' (Meanie Mouse Versus the Orlando Operators, 2009, etc.) newest offering is a fictional memoir, firmly grounded in historical fact. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 13, 2009

"A convoluted narrative desperately in need of an editor's eye and at least a modicum of logic and emotional truth."
This mystery novel springboards from interspecies gene-mixing to murder, terrorism, dirty politics and the Disneyfication of Orlando, Fla. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDERICK by Frederick Ndabaramiye
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"An awkwardly written but genuinely inspiring memoir of a disabled Rwandan educator."
A powerful Rwandan memoir of survival and transcendence, reduced to an oddly dry little book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDERICK by Leo Lionni
Kirkus Star
illustrated by Leo Lionni, translated by Teresa Mlawer
Released: April 14, 1967

"The conclusion may disappoint children who expect something snappier but the medium mandates the message—an old stone wall in subtle striated shades bordering a flowering field; rotund mice with big expressive eyes; a golden brown harvest of nuts and wheat; the becomingly blushing Frederick bowing at the end—all evoked with Mr. Lionni's customary expertise."
Words sustain where substance fails —specifically, the "golden glow" of the sun, the colors of the summer countryside, recalled by Frederick, the sedentary mouse, who prepares for winter by gathering impressions while his cohorts are busy gathering supplies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDERICK DOUGLASS by Walter Dean Myers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A posthumous title of distinction from the multiaward-winning novelist, biographer, historian, and third National Ambassador for Young People's Literature. (timeline, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 7-10)"
From slavery to anti-slavery activist—a life honored and remembered. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDERICK DOUGLASS by David A. Adler
BIOGRAPHY
Released: July 15, 2010

"An important resource, despite flaws. (timeline, source notes, bibliography, picture credits, index) (Nonfiction. 10 & up)"
Adler reports the life and times of the noted abolitionist in an attractive volume following an earlier treatment for younger readers (A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass, illustrated by Samuel Byrd, 1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"They certainly deserve better than this. (bibliography, index, notes) (Biography. 12+)"
A deeply flawed biography of the abolitionist leader points out the crying need for better sourcing and documentation in children's nonfiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREDERICK BILLINGS by Robin W. Winks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1991

"A balanced treatment, well researched, of a representative 19th-century figure caught up in the forces and movements of his time. (Sixteen b&w illustrations; five maps.)"
The well-told life and times of Frederick Billings (1823- 1890): Forty-Niner, attorney, railroad entrepreneur, philanthropist, and conservationist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >