Search Results: "G. Wayne Miller"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Still, it's worth brushing aside the formulaic dressing for the solid, detailed cross-section of the mass-culture machine that lies just beneath. (Author tour)"
Hours of fun for business-epic junkies of all ages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"A well-researched, well-told tale of surgical expertise transforming bodies and lives. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs- -not seen.)"
An engrossing profile of Hardy Hendren, chief of surgery at Boston's Children's Hospital, whose skills are devoted to undoing ``nature's worst mistakes.'' Miller, a staff writer for Rhode Island's Providence Journal-Bulletin, entwines a second tale with Hendren's—that of a family (the ``Moores'') whose daughter Lucy is born in late l989 with gross deformities affecting many of her internal organs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1995

"But his mostly successful exploration of their interests, anxieties, hopes, and dreams is certainly worth a look. (17 b&w photos, not seen)"
After a year of hanging out with Dave Bettencourt, a Rhode Island high school senior, Providence-based journalist Miller (The Work of Human Hands, 1992) concludes that, ``yes, it is more difficult to grow up'' in today's violent, media-plagued society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"With the medical profession under financial and ethical siege, Miller's breathless suspenseful reminder of the life-and-death-but-mostly-death drama of medical research, as well as the pathological risk-takers that drive it forward, could not have come at a more opportune time."
An unflinching, blood-and-guts look at the science and despair of modern open-heart surgery, framed by a biography of a giant in the field, Dr. C. Walton Lillehei. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A must for car lovers and plenty of interesting material to keep other curious readers flipping pages."
A chronicle of the frantic, ultracompetitive, and heroic early days of automobile manufacturing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"Suggestive but not entirely convincing. A modest addition to the popular psychology/self-help shelf."
A debunking of the popular treatments of "the alleged great [vertical] divide between the 'analytical/logical' left and 'artistic/intuitive' right halves of the human brain." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 2016

"A concise, enlightened examination of various perspectives on Christ."
Johnson (Whitey, 2011, etc.) investigates competing religious views of Jesus Christ. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Vegetable Kids in the Garden by Nancy J. Miller
Released: May 14, 2015

"An ample serving of entertainment, a full measure of health education, and a dash of Christian thought, perfectly blended and served in a nonpreachy way."
A clan of curious children and health-conscious grandparents discovers the joy of vegetables in Miller's (Fire Up Your Profile For LifeWork Success, 2012) Christian children's book.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON BECOMING A SWAN by Alice G. Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 27, 2014

"A memoir about the power of listening by a passionate psychotherapist."
After surviving an abusive childhood, a Christian woman goes on to become a counselor and psychotherapist in this highly readable memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORST OF TIMES by Patricia G. Miller
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"Wade."
Being published on the 20th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion: a heartrending compilation of personal tales of abortion prior to Roe v. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 1991

"Glossary; further reading; list of organizations; index. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Pedestrian, redundant writing and fuzzy focus undermine this effort from its first chapter (``This book is about lowland tropical moist forests...They grow in the tropics at low altitudes, as opposed to mountaintops, and are damp'') to its concluding plea for conservation (``Like a watchful lifeguard, we need to be aware that the rain forests are in trouble and heed their urgent cries for help''). Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARY MILLER
by Stephanie Buschardt

Despite its title, there’s not a lot of happiness going around in Mary Miller’s new collection, Always Happy Hour. “There is nothing more disgusting, really, than people enjoying themselves so thoroughly when you’re miserable,” writes Miller in the book’s opening story, a rather grim yet appropriate introduction to the morbid hilarity that’s to come in the following pages. More ...


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