Search Results: "G. Willow Wilson"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2010

"Enlightening cultural description and analysis blends somewhat awkwardly with self-regard."
Debut memoir chronicles Wilson's conversion to Islam and negotiation of Egyptian society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALIF THE UNSEEN by G. Willow Wilson
Released: July 3, 2012

"Wilson displays an admirable Neil Gaiman-esque ambition that isn't quite matched by this oft-plodding tale."
Modern hacker culture and ancient Muslim mysticism collide in the debut work of fiction from Wilson, better known as a graphic novelist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON by A. Scott Berg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"Readable, authoritative and, most usefully, inspiring."
Accomplished biographer Berg (Lindbergh, 1998, etc.) emphasizes the extraordinary talents of this unlikely president in an impressive, nearly hagiographic account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLOW by Julia Hoban
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2009

"However, Willow's acknowledgment of the cause of her grief—that she'll never be anyone's daughter again—is a sharp insight, and Hoban's appropriately complex portrayal of cutting makes this a good choice on a crucial subject. (Fiction. YA)"
Diluted by an expository and inconsistent narrative voice, this standard-issue problem novel will nonetheless appeal to readers interested in the topic of self-harm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLOW by Denise Brennan-Nelson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2008

"Pair this with Peter Reynolds's The Dot (2003) and Paul Zelinsky's Doodler Doodling (2004) for an outside-the-lines art experience. (Picture book. 6-10)"
In dictatorial Miss Hawthorn's cheerless art room, students sit "in their rows, silent and still, like eggs in a carton" producing cookie-cutter busywork. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLOW by Tonya Cherie Hegamin
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"A gripping but uneven exploration of the anguishing impact of slavery. (Historical fiction. 14-17)"
An educated slave girl struggles against the confines of race and gender in this coming-of-age story set in 1848 on the Pennsylvania-Maryland border. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILSON by David Mamet
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Well, folks, we're here to tell you—Wilson isn't even half-vast."
You'll want to clear your sinuses by renting a video of Glengarry Glen Ross or American Buffalo after wrestling with this unruly anti-novel by the noted playwright and remarkably unremarkable writer of fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G. by John Berger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1972

"Ultimately (and ignoring the common reader whom it will defeat) it is an arresting, inordinately vital, impersonal, and remarkable work."
G. as anonymously archetypal as the use of the initial suggests, is the novel or rather anti-novel of the prominent British art critic and Marxist humanist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G-SPOT by Noire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 25, 2005

"Raunchy and rough, but it moves."
Payback time for a good girl gone bad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

G-REX by Teri Daniels
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The story isn't messy like life, it is just aimless, and Pearson's artwork is too frail a scaffolding to give this shapeless narrative any structure. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A little brother gets a chance to be as teasing and bullyish as his big brother in this bit of purposeless wish-fulfillment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOODROW WILSON by John Milton Cooper Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 2009

"Cooper exhibits complete command of his materials, a sure knowledge of the man and a nuanced understanding of a presidency almost Shakespearean in its dimensions."
A noted Woodrow Wilson expert comprehensively examines the life and career of America's 28th president. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLOW FINDS A WAY by Lana Button
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"There is meanness and bullying at every level in schools, and it needs to be addressed in stories as well as in real life, but they must be honest stories in which the lesson does not outweigh the tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Shy Willow stands up to a mean girl in her primary-grade classroom. Read full book review >