Search Results: "Gabriel Garcia Marquez"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1976

When first seen at his second death, the solitary despot who has lived for a conjectural 107 to 232 years, lies in his dungheap "house of castaways," vultures pecking at his body while a cow appears on the balcony where he delivered his pronunciamentos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 25, 1969

"Those who pass time with the Senor will find this a luxuriant, splendid and spirited conception."
Those (guessably not the general reader) who do not find the labyrinthine configurations of Senor Garcia-Marquez' mighty myth impregnable, and at times interminable, will be rewarded by this story of one hundred years and six generations in the peaceful, primal and ageless world of Macondo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OF LOVE AND OTHER DEMONS by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 18, 1995

"Written with masterly economy, brimming with colorful episodes and vividly sketched characters: a haunting, cautionary tale that ranks among the author's best."
A bittersweet-comic version of all living things anchors this enchanting short novel by the acknowledged master of magical realism (Strange Pilgrims, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEWS OF A KIDNAPPING by Gabriel García Márquez
NON-FICTION
Released: June 4, 1997

"Garcia Marquez's consummate rendering of this hostage-taking looms as the symbol of an entire country held hostage to invisible yet violently ever-present drug lords."
In the same straightforward tone with which he relates the fabulous events of his fiction, Colombia's premier novelist presents the chillingly extraordinary events surrounding the 1992 abduction of ten prominent people by the Medellin drug cartel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHRONICLE OF A DEATH FORETOLD by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1983

"So, while the recent Nobel publicity will no doubt generate added interest, this is minor, lesser Garcia Marquez: characteristic themes illustrated without the often-characteristic charm and dazzle."
In this new novella by the Nobel Prize-winner, a Colombian-village murder 20 years in the past is raked over, brooded upon, made into a parable: how an Arab living in the town was assassinated by the loutish twin Vicario brothers when their sister, a new bride, was rejected by her bridegroom—who discovered the girl's unchastity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 1988

"Broad and brilliant as it is, though, there's an awful lot about a little here—a candy-box of a novel: more paper slots and creamy centers than something hard to bite down on."
Almost two decades after One Hundred Years of Solitude, Garcia Marquez has delivered another long, woolly, at times wonderful but consistently elective novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN EVIL HOUR by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1979

"Not major work but—again gloriously served by a fine Gregory Rabassa translation ('While the doctor was studying the dial, the curate examined the room with that boobish curiosity that consulting rooms tend to inspire')—a pleasing glimpse of a fanciful, vivid imagination at its most unforbidding."
First published in Spain in 1968—so a forebear of One Hundred Years of Solitude, G-M's benchmark—and set also in a small jungle town, this short friendly novel weaves much less exaggerated fantasy than OHYS, but shares the same calm yet gay prose and morose humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLLECTED STORIES by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1984

"Much that's brilliant, some that's merely strange and fragmentary, and almost all enhanced by the translations of Gregory Rabassa and S. J. Bernstein."
Twenty-six tales by the 1982 Nobel Prize Winner, rearranged in roughly chronological order of writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 1971

"The author's imagination, as always, is a closetful of wonders, and Gregory Rabassa's translation, as before, is virtually invisible."
Garcia Marquez returns to stir the dust of Macondo, his personal Caribbean fiefdom, which God and the banana company have apparently "declared unnecessary and thrown into a corner." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 28, 1978

The title novella and two stories are fairly recent; the rest, nine short pieces, date from the Fifties, when Garcia Marquez had not yet hit the stride of his famous fabulism and was working instead in a very French, very surrealist style, minutely and morbidly conscious of the deteriorating human body. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 1968

"Garcia Marquez' style is direct and matter-of-fact; in attitude, he accepts these characters with the same inevitability as they accept the heat and the rain."
One of the characters in this collection, which includes a novella and eight short stories, complains that. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 25, 1990

"Dutiful but dry as dust."
As the popularly agreed-upon preeminent Latin American storyteller, it is not unexpected that Garcia Marquez would take a turn at telling the epic story of Simon Bolivar, the Great Liberator. Read full book review >