Search Results: "Gabrielle Donnelly"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL IN THE PHOTOGRAPH by Gabrielle Donnelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 8, 1998

"Still, when the Mystery is unveiled, it hardly seems worth the journey."
Britisher Donnelly (Holy Mother, 1987, etc.) offers a semicomic novel about the search for family identity that misses the mark—despite well-honed characters and good intentions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE WOMEN LETTERS by Gabrielle Donnelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2011

"The Atwaters are amiable in small doses, but Alcott fans will find this chick lit's superficial relationship to the sneakily subversive Little Women insulting."
British-born Donnelly's first novel, payback for all the Americans rewriting Jane Austen, concerns a present-day London family with three sisters descended from and living adventures parallel to the eponymous Alcott heroines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THESE SHALLOW GRAVES by Jennifer Donnelly
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Readers who love costume dramas will relish this one. (Historical mystery. 13-17)"
In 19th-century Manhattan, socialite Jo Monfort's wealthy father meets an untimely death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NORTHERN LIGHT by Jennifer Donnelly
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"While tighter writing would have enhanced the work, this is nevertheless an absorbing story that will appeal strongly to the growing number of historical fiction fans. (Historical fiction. 12+)"
Donnelly combines a mystery with a coming-of-age story about a girl choosing among family obligations, romance, and education. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO STAGE A CATASTROPHE by Rebecca Donnelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2017

"Conspiratorial theatrics and all-around good fun. (Fiction. 9-12)"
"Catastrophe is the soul of the theater" in Donnelly's middle-grade debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An excellent supplement to any bar-examination study regimen."
In his first book, author Donnelly provides a general tutorial for the aspiring lawyer studying for the bar exam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HIPPO IN OUR YARD by Liza Donnelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2016

"'I told you!' Ah...words of gratification. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Donnelly, a cartoonist for the New Yorker magazine, brings her twisty imagination to strange happenings in Sally's backyard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKE DOWN THE STARS by Frances Donnelly
Released: March 16, 1989

A first novel by Britisher Donnelly that follows the WW II exploits of three Englishwomen—an aristocratic filly, a daughter of the newly rich, and a gardener's girl. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BAR STORIES by Nisa Donnelly
Released: April 18, 1989

Amateurish first novel composed of portraits of women whose paths cross in a lesbian bar in Oakland, California. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TEA ROSE by Jennifer Donnelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Bland, despite the gruesome-deaths quotient."
A bright, plucky, and (of course) beautiful Cockney girl escapes poverty and violence in the Whitechapel neighborhood of Victorian-era London to make her fortune in New York City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE END OF THE RAINBOW by Liza Donnelly
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2015

"Though children will probably move on from it quickly, it will definitely help them on their ways. (Early reader. 4-7)"
This early-reader riff on cumulative folk tales features a girl in pursuit of the end of a rainbow who discovers there's no pot of gold. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALCON'S CRY by Michael Donnelly
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"An honest, deeply felt look at the human cost of war. (photos, not seen)"
A moving memoir of the author's experiences as an air force pilot throughout the 1980s and the Persian Gulf War, that also confronts his seeming postwar diagnosis of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and his subsequent realization that he did not have ALS, but rather, "Gulf War syndrome.— While lacking the polish of an experienced writer, Donnelly makes up for this with an impressive degree of candor—discussing his reluctance, for example, to see a doctor although he fears that his flying skills have been impaired—and manages to convey his feelings of loyalty to the armed services, even in the wake of his discovery that those very same forces had experimented on him with medicines not yet approved by the FDA. Read full book review >