Search Results: "Gadi Bloom"


BOOK REVIEW

ARIEL SHARON by Nir Hefez
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 24, 2006

"Peacemakers are rare in the Middle East today, and this well-written biography is thus particularly timely."
An admiring, if critical, life of the Israeli warrior/politician. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SPLENDID FRIEND, INDEED by Suzanne Bloom
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"Bear's ursine fuzziness against a background of deep blues and Goose's small awkward, overeager self make an adorable contrast. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A more perfect union between giggle-inducing but reassuring images and a text of very few words is hard to conjure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT ABOUT BEAR? by Suzanne Bloom
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2010

"Another splendid outing, indeed. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A small red fox joins playmates Goose and Polar Bear, introduced in A Splendid Friend, Indeed (2005)—setting up a "three's a crowd" conflict that even the still-diapered set will quickly recognize. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEEDING FRIENDSIES by Suzanne Bloom
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Give two green thumbs up for the joy of mud pies everywhere. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Getting dirty has never been so much fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLF! by Becky Bloom
Released: March 1, 1999

"The cartoonish figures have expressive faces and postures, offering plenty for readers to pore over. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An entertaining tale featuring well-known figures; a tired, hungry wold enters a little town populated by disgruntled people, humorously drawn by Biet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VERGIL'S AENEID by Harold Bloom
POETRY
Released: Dec. 16, 1996

"The series, so far, goes from the Aeneid to Angelou; each volume is loaded with colorful educational tools and offers a ready source of structured information. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
This is the first entry in the Bloom's Notes series, part of the Contemporary Literary Views Books; Bloom (The Western Canon, 1994, etc.) introduces Vergil, then steps back as various writers and academic experts past and present provide analyses of theme, character, and literary worth, mostly through excerpts from previously published material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEARTS & OTHER BODY PARTS by Ira Bloom
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 28, 2017

"A reworking of some classic stories that will entertain its readers even if it doesn't stay with them very long. (Fantasy. 13-18) "
Franklin N. "Norm" Stein, a scarred teen with acromegaly, starts at a new school where he meets a trio of sisters who are witches and helps them escape the thrall of two vampires. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE THE GOD OF LOVE HANGS OUT by Amy Bloom
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 19, 2010

"Not Bloom at her very best, but impressive enough confirmation of this clever writer's ability to challenge the way we see ourselves and to show us as we are."
Nine uncollected stories plus three that appeared in earlier collections are interestingly arranged and recombined in this latest from the Manhattan psychotherapist and versatile author (Away, 2008, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Remarkable ideas remarkably set forth."
Bloom wanders a bit, away from Yale into "the Evening Land" of America and its churches—and reconstructs a remarkable diagram of the religious imagination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JESUS AND YAHWEH by Harold Bloom
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 2005

"Bloom barely provides a gloss on more substantial work, such as the two volumes by Jack Miles (God: A Biography, 1995; Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God, 2001), which are often invoked in these pages."
A return to the Bible by the noted Yale professor and literary critic, though the slapdash results lack the depth of most of the volumes he cites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLIGHT TO LUCIFER by Harold Bloom
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 2, 1979

"A close-to-unreadable exercise, only for those who share Bloom's gnostic preoccupations—or collectors of literary oddities."
Bloom has been salting his literary criticism with dashes of kabbalistic and gnostic incunabula for years; here, in this first novel, he really lets his obsession run wild—and we can only hope that it's now out of his system. Read full book review >