Search Results: "Gael Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

INSATIABLE by Gael Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2006

"Name-dropping with relish."
An outrageously fun memoir from novelist and longtime New York magazine dining critic Greene that reads more like Who-I-Slept-With rather than What-I-Ate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROMANCING MISS BRONTË by Juliet Gael
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 27, 2010

"A must-read for Brontë aficionados and anyone interested in the lives and concerns of Victorian women."
Novelized biography of Charlotte Brontë, with emphasis on her love life, or lack thereof. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LUCKY ONES by Stephanie Greene
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

The prevailing sensibility in this relic of a novel hearkens back to a simpler time, perhaps mid-20th century, when young girls knew the difference between a magnum of champagne and a regular old bottle, Mom wore pearls, everyone on the island went to the club and Grandfather's kindly African-American cook was named Sheba. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NINETEEN STORIES by Graham Greene
Released: Feb. 14, 1948

"On the author's name, the volume will carry to a wider market than is usual in this medium."
In an acknowledgment by the author that these stories (written at intervals over the last two decades) are only by-products of a novelist's career, there is the recognition also that they will not rank with his more serious- or longer-works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1980

"So: not the memoir some might hope for—even less a sort of life than A Sort of Life (1971)—but, on its own terms, sufficiently alluring."
In no sense an autobiography—"Those parts of a life most beloved of columnists remain outside the scope of this book"—this is a suavely arranged, roughly chronological group of personal essays, most of them previously published: the introductions to the British collected edition of Greene's oeuvre; reportage from international trouble spots (Greene has sought peril as one "way of escape" from a vaguely defined angst); salutes to two or three friends; plus a few anecdotes and reflections. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEART OF THE MATTER by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 1948

"For an adult, appreciative audience."
Reported originally in the February 15th bulletin, this was postponed to the above date as a mid-summer selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 14, 1973

"There is also an inductive introduction by Mr. Greene on how he now views the short story and on some of the curious circumstances in which a few of them were conceived."
Forty in all, representing a forty-year span, "a collection of escapes from the novelist's world" and combining those which appeared in May We Borrow Your Husband?, A Sense of Reality, Twenty-One Stories, as well as three which appear in book form for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LATE EDITION by Bob Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2009

"A fervent, entertaining journey back to a time when print media still mattered."
A valedictory hymn to the daily newspaper, composed by a lifelong journalist who began his career cranking carbon paper into newsroom typewriters and now blogs from his laptop. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 2, 2006

"In this Tuesdays (And All Other Days) with Jack, the author mostly sidesteps the maudlin."
Journeyman Greene (Once Upon a Town, 2002, etc.) celebrates the life and mourns the death of his oldest friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHIPWRECKED by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 9, 1952

"A provocative, occasionally speculative portrayal of marginal lives- to which disenchantment lends its finality."
A republication of an early novel which appeared in 1935 under the title England Made Me, and which was not widely read at that time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMEDIANS by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 28, 1965

"It may not be his most important book but a good many attractive adjectives apply."
Greene usually subdivides his fiction into novels or entertainments. Read full book review >