Search Results: "Garrison Keillor"


BOOK REVIEW

LIBERTY by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2008

"'Living in Lake Wobegon was like being stuck in a bad marriage,' thinks Clint, leaving the rest of the novel to resolve whether the Bunsens' marriage is worse than most."
One of the funnier Lake Wobegon novels might be the saddest as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"As with Ken Kesey's Garage Sale, though, even the most discriminating reader will find the book worth the price of admission, with some change left over."
A potpourri of stories, essays, letters, occasional pieces and even poems from the folksy humorist of Prairie Home Companion fame (Lake Wobegon Days, Leaving Home). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

O, WHAT A LUXURY by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Readers drawn to this will know exactly what they are looking for, and they will find it."
A companion volume of light verse for fans of the radio host's A Prairie Home Companion.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WLT by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Humor and insight into the heart of raunchy America don't get any better than this."
The glory days of Midwest radio prove the ideal subject for old radio-hand Keillor, now writing at the height of his awesome power, which could make a homesick cat laugh. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KEILLOR READER by Garrison Keillor
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2014

"Keillor's moments of contemplation have produced some of the finest essays in this lovely collection."
Melancholy and joy infuse Keillor's (O, What a Luxury: Verses Lyrical, Vulgar, Pathetic and Profound, 2013, etc.) latest collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAVING HOME by Garrison Keillor
Released: Oct. 5, 1987

"Once again, Keillor has shown himself to be in superb command of his craft, dusting and polishing American lore and idiom up to a warm glow, and handling his characters with equal measures of humor and affection."
Heartily entertaining follow-up to Keillor's major Lake Wobegon success, comprising 36 interconnected Wobegon stories—including Keillor's farewell monologue from the final Prairie Home Companion radio broadcast. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF GUYS by Garrison Keillor
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"You do have to be literate."
More from the master of the broadcast memoir (WLT, 1991; We Are Still Married, 1989; etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAKE WOBEGON SUMMER 1956 by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Think Huckleberry Finn in hormonal overdrive, or Penrod with a perpetual erection. They won't be assigning this one in elementary schools, but adults of all ages should find Keillor's refreshingly impudent Americana just about irresistible."
You really can hear the hushed resonant voice of the genial host of NPR's Prairie Home Companion reciting this latest episodic chronicle of growing up in rural Minnesota. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 1998 by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 30, 1998

"For the trade only, as they say: a coffeetable book that few will want to crack."
Radio host Keillor (Wobegon Boy, 1997, etc.) takes a station break and puts together this year's Best American collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PONTOON by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 2007

"The family and community ties are strong, the people are good looking and the belly-laugh quotient is above average. Tune in. You won't be disappointed."
The life and loves of a spirited woman cast a beguiling shadow over the good citizens of Lake Wobegon in Keillor's warmhearted latest comic romp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOBEGON BOY by Garrison Keillor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 27, 1997

"And that's the news from Lake Wobegon."
No, that's not thunder you're hearing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY TO BE HERE by Garrison Keillor
Released: Jan. 12, 1981

"Mostly minor-league humor, then, but with enough one-of-a-kind touches (including a few likably autobiographical snippets) to rise just a little above the crowd."
Keillor's parodies, satires, and whimsies—which have been appearing in The New Yorker since 1969—rarely provide big laughs or Perelmanic dazzle; but they do have an affectionate, easygoing, back-home quality that makes for a nice change from the clenched-up sparring of most New York-based humorists. Read full book review >