Search Results: "Gary Paulsen"


BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY TIES by Gary Paulsen
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 22, 2014

"Another funny episode in a well-meaning (sort of, anyway) kid's life. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Kevin, 14 and no stranger to hyperbole, is back for a fifth humor-infused outing as he tries valiantly to deal with his often bizarre extended family (Vote, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAWN BOY by Gary Paulsen
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 12, 2007

"Capital! (Fiction. 9-12)"
After his grandmother gives him an old riding lawnmower for his summer birthday, this comedy's 12-year-old narrator putt-putts into a series of increasingly complex and economically advantageous adventures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOTE by Gary Paulsen
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 13, 2013

"Still, especially for kids who have watched recent elections, Kevin's brand of campaigning is readily recognizable. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Kevin knows the buzzwords that will surely get him elected student-body president; it's unfortunate that he's running for the wrong reason. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. TUCKET by Gary Paulsen
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1969

"Unfortunate."
A wild (i.e. unfocused, unfounded) Western that turns sanctimonious at the conclusion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 3, 1997

"These meditations don't quite add up to a full-tilt memoir, but they make a nice entertainment all the same."
Lyrical and pleasing reflections on machinery, midlife crisis, and sundry other matters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: March 1, 1990

"A perceptive portrait of a kid on the verge of getting out of his self-set trap of imagining any change as a threat—even change for the better: a memorably funny yet touching farce."
A total surprise from the award-winning author of, most recently, The Winter Room (1989, Newbery Honor): a comic, accessible novel about a classic 15-year-old klutz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ISLAND by Gary Paulsen
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1988

"Fuller development of the parents would have made a stronger book; still, Wil's realization that they too are worthy of understanding makes a poignant conclusion to a novel that will appeal most to the unusual reader."
In a milder variation on the theme of self-discovery through experience sounded in Hatchet (Newbery Honor, 1988), Wil spends a few solitary days on an island near his home, tuning into nature and his own creativity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VOYAGE OF THE FROG by Gary Paulsen
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1988

"Like the adults in Hatchet, David's parents and Owen remain shadowy figures, within the range of the possible (though few parents would willingly allow a boy to undertake such a journey), but that is beside the point: this story is about the voyage of the Frog—an epic, often lyrical journey of self-discovery, perhaps less gripping than Hatchet but with a subtler, more penetrating delineation of its protagonist."
Another tautly written survival story, much like Hatchet (1987, Newbery Honor Book) in design, though not in incident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CROSSING by Gary Paulsen
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1987

"Graphic details and some harsh language make this a book for older children and teen-agers who will not want to put it down."
Returning to some of the themes of Sentries, Paulsen tells a harshly taut story, set in a Mexican border town, about two people who meet on the edge of oblivion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOXMAN by Gary Paulsen
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1977

"But the boy's relationship with the old man seems stagey, and the Foxman himself only a mouthpiece."
Set during the Korean war, this combination wilderness/anti-war story is narrated by a fifteen-year-old boy sent by the court to his Uncle's northern Minnesota farm after "my folks decided to stay drunk all the time." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SENTRIES by Gary Paulsen
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 1986

"The novel's power lies in the immediacy of these truncated beginnings; its only hope is in the title: if these promising young people are sentries, can they guard against annihilation of the fecund world so poignantly evoked on Paulsen's last page?"
Four young adults come to dramatic realizations that would profoundly alter their futures. . .if the world survived. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTERKILL by Gary Paulsen
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"Ultimately Duda's brand of toughness is simply bathetic, but readers who can take the explicit violence and are mature enough not to mistake clever writing for profundity will want to make that judgment on their own."
It's a measure of Paulsen's gut level effectiveness that one really does come to feel some affection for Duda, a corrupt cop who extorts graft from kids in the form of illegally taken fish, who spends most of his night shifts shooting rabbits and visiting his mistress, and who kills two unresisting bank robbers in cold blood. Read full book review >