Search Results: "Gaye Chapman"


BOOK REVIEW

KAITO’S CLOTH by Glenda Millard
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2008

"Though mannered and probably over the heads of younger children, this isn't nearly as twee as it sounds, and may provide solace to readers facing their own change or loss. (Picture book. 6+)"
Japanese influences in the telling and the pictures notwithstanding, this first U.S. edition of an original tale reads most plainly as metaphor, unlinked to a particular time or place. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH AND THE CHAPMAN by Kate Sedley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

"A strong debut."
A septuagenarian recalls his youth, when, in 1471, he quit the Benedictines (no calling), became a chapman (a wandering peddler), and discovered his affinity for detective work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRECIOUS LITTLE by Julie Hunt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Children (and adults) can be lost for a long and pleasurable time amid the sparkles. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A tatterdemalion heroine wearing rags and stars falls into a dream hole and flies through the heavens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 2004

"Slightly marred by the author's tendency to wandering wordiness, but lovers of the genre will certainly forgive her."
A sordid case that spread sensation like wildfire across an 1830s America just beginning to flex its national brand of jurisprudence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2005

"Irish to the gills, a festive delight, and fully aware of what it is—and what it isn't."
Newspaper columns and a stage adaptation (The Brother) quilted out of O'Brien's novels make for a merry little patchwork of literary pleasures from the late (d. 1966) comic master (At Swim-Two-Birds, 1939). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AGAINST THE STORM by Gaye Hicyilmaz
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"A memorable story that will open minds and hearts. (Fiction. 12+)"
It's a common story: a family abandons a farm whose crops no longer sustain them, only to discover that the city offers even less hope. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT'S THAT by Gaye Walsh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 20, 2010

"A breezy read from a capable talent."
Generations of an Irish family cope with decades of personal and political turmoil in Walsh's endearing debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FROZEN WATERFALL by Gaye Hiáyilmaz
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"Superb. (Fiction. 12+)"
Selda, a young Turkish immigrant in Switzerland, was a star pupil in her small hometown of Izmir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMILING FOR STRANGERS by Gaye Hicyilmaz
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2000

"Yet, the flesh and blood Nina remains emotionally out of reach, inhibiting the reader from making a true connection. (Historical fiction. 10-12)"
Exhibiting a shrewdness born from desperation, a fourteenyearold girl makes the hazardous journey from the wartorn countryside outside of Sarajevo to the safety of England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER THE DANCE by Jan Gaye
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2015

"A fascinating, unsentimental account of a be-careful-what-you-wish-for romance."
The long-suffering wife of Marvin Gaye (1939-1984) tells the story of her turbulent relationship with the legendary soul singer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIME’S PHOTOGRAPH by Leif Davidsen
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2003

"Strong beginning, squishy middle, smashing climax: Davidsen (The Russian Singer, 1991, etc.) does the edgy, European atmospherics to a turn."
A Danish paparazzo sees through a lens darkly in this taut, violent thriller about betrayal and revenge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IS IT CHRISTMAS YET? by Jane Chapman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A story with a youngster getting ready for Christmas with just his dad should be a welcome choice for single fathers to share with their children. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little bear named Teddy gets ready for Christmas with his father, Big Bear, in this decidedly cheerful British import. Read full book review >