Search Results: "Gela Nash-Taylor"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2014

"A feel-good American success story recounted with candor, heart and attitude."
With the assistance of Moore, the founders of Juicy Couture chronicle their real-life fairy tale in a "part memoir, part how-to-manual and part fashion industry field guide." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIDDLE OF THE NILE by Deborah Nash
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2007

"Factual information presented, however brief, could be enhanced with a short bibliography or suggested reading list, as Tamar Bower does in the more authentic-looking and beautiful rendition of the story, How the Amazon Queen Fought the Prince of Egypt (2005). (Picture book. 5-7)"
Eager to prove his wisdom and worthiness to become King of the Nile, Baby Crocodile swims up the river in search of the answer to Crookedy Crocodile's riddle (the classic St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHRUNKEN TREASURES by Scott Nash
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 12, 2016

"Children won't get the jokes; adult readers won't laugh at them. (closing notes) (Satire. 10-12, adult)"
With his "Versizer," a literary shrink ray, Nash condenses works of Homer, Shakespeare, Proust, and six other classic authors into illustrated light verse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUFF FLUFF by Scott Nash
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2004

"Neither these pictures nor the overlong narrative capture the snappy tone of David Wisniewski's Tough Cookie (1999), Margie Palatini's Web Files (2001), or similar takeoffs, but still young readers will never regard their castoff beanie babies in quite the same light again. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Illustrator Nash flies solo with a plush-boiled whodunit set amidst the shadowed cardboard cartons of "Los Attic." Read full book review >

BLOG POST

NO ONE REMEMBERS YOUR NAME, WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for Strange the Dreamer (Strange the Dreamer #1) (ISBN13: 978-0-316-34168-4) by Laini Taylor

Cover Story: Sparklemoth Split
BFF Charm: Yay x2
Swoonworthy Scale: 7
Talky Talk: Dreams of Libraries and Godspawn
Bonus Factors: Librarians, Tasty Business
Relationship Status: Missing My Other Half

Cover Story: Sparklemoth Split

Although I’m not crazy about the font, this is such a pretty ...


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BOOK REVIEW

A PHOENIX RISING by Bryan Nash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 11, 2007

"A tearjerker that will inspire those familiar with abuse."
A raw look at a childhood defined by abandonment and abuse, based on a true story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN GOGH’S EAR by David Nash
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"While filled with moments of psychotically brilliant wordplay, as a novel, it's almost unreadable."
Two brothers leave Utah for Los Angeles, where they move into an apartment above a crack house and embark on a series of drunken escapades and liaisons, stalk a rapist and meet the bloody culmination prefigured at the book's beginning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNCIVIL RIGHTS by Nash Candelaria
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Ultimately, Candelaria's soulless Anglos bear about as much relation to reality as the noble Latinos they oppress."
A second collection, mostly set among the Chicanos of the American Southwest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAISING ABEL by Carolyn Nash
Released: Nov. 5, 2011

"A sobering but uplifting tale of love that never gives up; dramatically told, ultimately rewarding."
A woman of remarkable resourcefulness single-handedly raises a troubled child all the way to manhood in this intimate and inspiring blog-to-book memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 2003

"A smoothly detailed study of one shady man—an exploiter and murder suspect who drove his meal ticket to the grave—and not even praiseworthy for his business acumen."
Colonel Parker: con man, impresario, criminal—though perhaps best summed up by his military discharge report, "Psychosis, Psychogenic Depression, acute, on basis of Constitutional Psychopathic State, Emotional Instability." Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHARLES TAYLOR

Reliant as they were on call girls, cars, corpses, and Kris Kristofferson, the B-movies of the 1970s may not qualify as high art, according to cultural critic Charles Taylor, but at least they took American audiences seriously.

“For me, the staying power of these movies has to do with the way they stand in opposition to the current juvenile state ...


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