Search Results: "Gene Logsdon"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

The author (Two Acre Eden, 1971) has written a good deal about farming in books and articles, and these essays (1980-92) were written, by Logsdon's own admission, ``out of anger'' at the decline of rural society, the result, he believes, of ``a nation's greed.'' Here he targets some root causes—from educational, media and governmental malfeasances. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LETTER TO A YOUNG FARMER by Gene Logsdon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2017

"From raising cattle to organizing markets, there's much value here for every aspiring farmer, whose work requires brains along with brawn."
An elegant, modern georgic in prose by "contrary farmer" Logsdon (Gene Everlasting, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GENE EVERLASTING by Gene Logsdon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 2014

"Wisdom and experience permeate this perceptive and understatedly well-written meditation."
A self-proclaimed contrarian and octogenarian cancer survivor finds renewal in the prospect of death while raising issues that challenge science and religion alike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Reliant's: Price by Stephen Logsdon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"The author wisely expands his fictional and increasingly riveting futuristic universe, with room to grow."
A survivor of the first encounter with aliens in 2164 spearheads a mission to rescue a hijacked civilian ship and crew from an ostensibly aggressive species in this sci-fi tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIOLENCE ON AMERICA'S STREETS by Gene Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1992

"Chronology; further reading; index. (Nonfiction. 10- 13.)"
Gangs, guns, crack, Guardian Angels, police-chief mayors, and other major issues are succinctly characterized in this well- balanced summary of street crime and justice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 5, 2009

"Punchy and persuasive."
Garman fashions a forceful argument for the separation of church and state, backed up by a bevy of useful historical documents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Ordinary Evil by Gene Ferraro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 31, 2014

"A vivid, cinematic dramatization of the ripple effects that crime and secrets can have on a small community and a larger faith."
Ferraro's lean and expertly plotted debut novel tells the story of several people—families as well as priests—caught in a tangle of violence and corruption that stretches from Massachusetts to the Vatican. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARK TIMES IN THE CITY by Gene Kerrigan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2013

"Kerrigan's fourth crime yarn (The Rage, 2013, etc.) captures a landscape of moral ambiguity with a crackling pace and terse, apt dialogue. His world suggests an Irish Elmore Leonard whose compromised men struggle to tread water in a treacherous sea."
One moment, Dublin ex-con Danny Callaghan is minding his own business; the next, he's back in the cross hairs of both cops and criminals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1997

"But the overarching theme of cross-cultural pollination remains merely a rough reference point for the volume—a title pasted across a disparate, if thoughtful collection of writings."
An impressive variety of music is surveyed—rock, jazz, reggae, Afropop, Brazilian Tropicalia—in these reviews and interviews reprinted from the Nation, the Atlantic Monthly, and elsewhere. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STOREYS FROM THE OLD HOTEL by Gene Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1992

"This edition should bring the many excellent pieces the wider attention and approbation they deserve."
A fine collection—originally published in 1988 by a small British press in a limited edition, and winner of the World Fantasy Award for Best Collection of that year—showcases the wide range of Wolfe's weird and wonderful talent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

K-PAX by Gene Brewer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1995

"A genial psych lecture supplemented by a hefty dose of utopian blather. (Film rights to Universal)"
An Oliver Sacks-ish New York shrink hangs out with an upbeat Man Who Fell to Earth in this banal debut. Read full book review >