Search Results: "Geoff Ryman"


BOOK REVIEW

AIR by Geoff Ryman
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"Not always compelling as fiction, then, but containing many a worthy insight about how the world will be dragged further into the Information Age, like it or not."
Like the Internet, only more so. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNCONQUERED COUNTRIES by Geoff Ryman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 1994

"Others will note the artificially heightened prose, the clever mechanics, the polished inventiveness, the ulterior meanings, and they will remain emotionally unmoved."
Four novellas, two previously unpublished, from the author of the acclaimed Was (1992) and The Child Garden (1990). ``The Unconquered Country'' (1986), Ryman's allegorical dark fantasy about Cambodia and Vietnam, has previously appeared as a book in its own right. ``O Happy Day!'' (1985), a tale of sociobiology and feminist backlash, features a transit camp run by homosexual men to which trainloads of males are dispatched for extermination by the feminists now controlling the country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUST by Geoff Ryman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 6, 2003

"Not, therefore, Ryman's best, but a risky, highly imaginative addition to a unique and valuable body of work."
A research biologist explores the parameters of love, sex, and creativity in this inventive, inordinately busy latest from the provocative British author (253, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

253 by Geoff Ryman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1998

"TRY IT!"
An inventive parody of information retrieval, by the ever-amazing author of, among others, Was (1992), a revisionist modern version of The Wizard of Oz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAS by Geoff Ryman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 29, 1992

"Science-fiction author Ryman (The Child Garden, 1990) takes a giant step forward with this mixture of history, fantasy, and cultural myth—all yoked together by the question of whether you can ever really go home."
The Scarecrow of Oz dying of AIDS in Santa Monica? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VEIL OF ILLUSION by Rebecca Ryman
Released: Aug. 15, 1995

Ryman's sequel to Olivia and Jai (1990)a tale of lust, racism, and honor in the British Rajhas noble intentions but lacks the subtlety and restraint to realize them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AIR by Kyla Ryman
by Kyla Ryman, illustrated by Nathalie Trovato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Breathe deep, and turn the page. (Board book. 1-3)"
High-contrast paper-collage illustrates a catalog of air's uses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 22, 2017

"A hortatory call to arms for young people and a harsh critique of their ruling elders."
A young Canadian journalist argues that a unique generational values shift is occurring that may upend just about everything to save the planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TAPPER TWINS GO TO WAR (WITH EACH OTHER) by Geoff Rodkey
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 7, 2015

"This frothy family contretemps ends on a note of sincere reconciliation (once Reese's hair grows back out, anyway)—that's presumably upended in time for the sequel. (Fiction. 10-12)"
An escalating sibling spat delivers "a buttload of life lessons" along with tears, terrible smells, a dorky mohawk and massive numbers of video game casualties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLOUR OF MEMORY by Geoff Dyer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 2014

"Random sharp insights and images are studded inside this leisurely and oddly innocent chronicle of British Gen-X slackers."
Dyer, the prolific British essayist and novelist who now lives in the U.S. and won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Otherwise Known as the Human Condition (2011), published his first novel—an impressionistic, affectionate portrait of a group of 1980s British bohemians—in the U.K. in 1989. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 5, 2014

"Somewhat more optimistic than Harry Dent Jr.'s The Demographic Cliff (2013), insistent that the key to Western influence-shaping lies in economic housecleaning. All bets are on as to whether that can happen."
It's in all the headlines: China and the United States are increasingly at loggerheads. As Financial Times journalist Dyer notes, it's likely to get more heated in years to come. Read full book review >