Search Results: "Geoffrey Chaucer"


BOOK REVIEW

CHAUCER AND THE DOCTOR OF PHYSIC by Philippa Morgan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"Lacks the fast pace of the poet's first case (Chaucer and the House of Fame, 2004), but the interesting characters and historical tidbits make it worthwhile."
Geoffrey Chaucer travels to Devon to avert a diplomatic crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHAUCER by Peter Ackroyd
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 2005

"A splendid introduction to a pivotal figure in the history of English literature. (21 b&w illustrations)"
The first in a new series, Ackroyd Brief Lives, offers a fascinating portrait of the man who has been called the father of English poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHANTICLEER AND THE FOX by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Sept. 15, 1958

"A story which needs no defense, handled here with respect and facility."
Adapted from the Chaucer, this is the fable of the vain but wise Cock and the crafty fox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Not quite the achievement that the Divine Comedy was, but a work that finds an artistic common denominator for Chaucer and Chwast."
As a follow-up of sorts to his illustrated Dante's Divine Comedy (2010), graphic artist Chwast embraces a kindred spirit in Chaucer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OH DEAR, GEOFFREY! by Gemma O'Neill
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 13, 2014

"Oh yes, Geoffrey! (Picture book. 3-6)"
Can a clumsy giraffe make friends? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 2009

"A not-very-illuminating updating of Chaucer's Tales."
Continuing his apparent mission to refract the whole of English culture and history through his personal lens, Ackroyd (Thames: The Biography, 2008, etc.) offers an all-prose rendering of Chaucer's mixed-media masterpiece. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE POETRY OF CHAUCER by John Gardner
Released: March 1, 1977

"For all his obvious love and learning, Gardner has failed to make his own words, as Chaucer made his, 'cousin to the deed."
The highly regarded novelist (Grendel; Jason and Medeia) is also a Middle English scholar of long standing; his biographical companion to the present volume will appear this spring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHAUCER AND THE HOUSE OF FAME by Philippa Morgan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Morgan's debut wraps a muted mystery in a crackling adventure and some top-notch history."
Fourteenth-century poet Geoffrey Chaucer solves the murder of a French comte, husband of his long-lost love. Read full book review >