Search Results: "Geoffrey Chaucer"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 2009

"A not-very-illuminating updating of Chaucer's Tales."
Continuing his apparent mission to refract the whole of English culture and history through his personal lens, Ackroyd (Thames: The Biography, 2008, etc.) offers an all-prose rendering of Chaucer's mixed-media masterpiece. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

Burton Raffel has made two key decisions in his rendition of Chaucer's greatest work. While most editions stick to the half-dozen or so best-known stories—the raunchy "Miller's Tale" and the proto-feminist "Wife of Bath's Tale" being the most popular with contemporary readers—Raffel offers modern English versions of even such unfinished fragments as "The Squire's Tale" and such often-skipped sections as "The Parson's Tale." Few today will be burning to hear from the longwinded parson, but in general this unabridged edition is a delight. It lets you appreciate the masterful way Chaucer unifies his stylistically and topically diverse stories with a few overarching themes: the proper relationship between man and woman (the answer's not what you'd expect from a 14th-century civil servant), the role of the clergy (they're only human in his realistic portraits), the all-powerful impact of chance on our destinies. Having the full text also enables readers to enjoy the sly way Chaucer toys with them, allowing his raconteurs to interrupt their narratives with such tantalizing phrases as, "but nothing like that can be included here." The unabridged edition provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer's earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CANTERBURY TALES by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Not quite the achievement that the Divine Comedy was, but a work that finds an artistic common denominator for Chaucer and Chwast."
As a follow-up of sorts to his illustrated Dante's Divine Comedy (2010), graphic artist Chwast embraces a kindred spirit in Chaucer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHANTICLEER AND THE FOX by Geoffrey Chaucer
Released: Sept. 15, 1958

"A story which needs no defense, handled here with respect and facility."
Adapted from the Chaucer, this is the fable of the vain but wise Cock and the crafty fox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GAME OF THEIR LIVES by Geoffrey Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Worthy of comparison to such classics of sports reporting as David Halberstam's Summer of '49, this book should be a real kick for soccer rooters and nonfans alike."
A timely and authoritative account of the Americans who pulled off one of the sporting world's most stunning upsets by defeating the powerhouse English soccer team in the 1950 World Cup. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAFARI by Geoffrey Kent
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"The photographs, many mere snapshots, reinforce suspicion that this is a private memoir for distribution to family and clients that somehow escaped into the world. Of some interest to outsiders, though, for revealing that 'Shanghai Peking duck is much better than Peking Peking duck' and similar arcana."
An account of luxury-travel adventures for the well-to-do. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEEP END by Geoffrey Norman
Released: March 23, 1994

"Another agreeable, lazily plotted John D. MacDonald knockoff from Norman (Sweetwater Ranch, Blue Chipper), who's welcome to keep spinning yarns like this for another hundred years."
Ex-SEAL Phil Garvey's not the kind of guy who'd get involved with drugs, so when his dive buddy—Florida panhandle investigator Morgan Hunt—sees that he's being hassled by Coast Guard searches, he doesn't waste any time getting his sometime employer, lawyer Nat Semmes, to identify disgruntled dive pupil Frank Loftin as the perjured informant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"38;w photos, not seen)."
A murdered Yale student and a 15-year-old New Haven gangbanger charged with the crime are the principals in this passionate, self- consciously empathetic account of the clash between poverty and privilege. Read full book review >