Search Results: "George Ancona"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"It's sure to bring out the green thumb of many an educator, and it just may provoke some kids to get out in their own yards and make a garden. (bibliography, websites) (Informational picture book. 5-8, adult)"
Ancona takes readers on a yearlong tour of one Santa Fe, N.M., school garden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN WE HELP? by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"While this may be too didactic for many readers to choose on their own, it's a sure bet for groups and families focused on doing some community service. (Nonfiction. 5-12)"
Kids don't often get a chance to help others outside their families in meaningful ways. This book may change that. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOYS DANCING by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2017

"This is an enjoyable introduction to the world of dance that portrays dance as a diverse art form and capable means of expression for all children. (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
Photo essayist Ancona introduces readers to the joys of dance through the eyes of four grade schoolers: Raptor, Ely, Logan, and Ryan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CUTTERS, CARVERS AND THE CATHEDRAL by George Ancona
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: March 1, 1995

"No one could have anticipated such an end (temporary though it may be) for the cathedral, but it has the effect of sucking the spirit right out of this book. (glossary) (Picture book/nonfiction. 6+)"
The unfinished, monolithic Cathedral of Saint John the Divine looms over Morningside Heights, New York City, a massive work in progress that is currently at a standstill for lack of funding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POWWOW by George Ancona
by George Ancona, photographed by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1993

"A lively, positive portrayal of contemporary Native Americans. (Nonfiction. 6-12)"
Capturing the flash and rhythm of Native American dances as performed during a ``pan-Indian'' Crow Fair in Montana, photographer Ancona is at his experienced best. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIESTA U.S.A. by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The book conveys the festivity of each ceremony and serves both as a valuable introduction to and a celebration of some of the Latino cultures that enrich this country. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8-10)"
Four Latino-American festivals are chronicled here, photographed in four different citiesDay of the Dead (San Francisco), Las Posadas (Albuquerque), Matachines (El Rancho, New Mexico), and Three Kings' Day (New York City). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURALS by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"A unique chronicle of our country's diversity and an engaging look at the connection between the arts and activism: Ancona's latest is first rate. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Photojournalist Ancona (Harvest, not reviewed, etc.) takes his camera to the streets in this exploration of outdoor community murals in cities across the US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPOEIRA by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2007

"For martial-arts fans, armchair travelers and anyone who wants to view a new way of having fun. (bibliography, glossary) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
The most playful of the martial arts takes a star turn in this excellent photo essay done by a master of the genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET'S DANCE! by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"A festive commemoration of movement. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-6)"
Through clear, lively photographs, Ancona (Fiesta U.S.A., 1995, etc.) explores the expression of dance throughout the world and demonstrates its universality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PIÑATA MAKER/EL PIÑATERO by George Ancona
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1994

"Creating a couple of other shapes and a party where one of them meets its intended end round out an attractive presentation. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
In lucid color photos and a simple bilingual text, the work of 77-year-old Don Ricardo (``Tio Rico''), a Mexican craftsman who ``started creating pi§atas fifteen years ago when...making felt sombreros became too hard for him.'' Beginning with a small boy delivering some of Tio Rico's materials (old newpapers and paper bags), Ancona leads into a detailed depiction of making of an unusual swan pi§ata. Read full book review >