Search Results: "George F. Kennan"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1996

"Imagine a 20th-century Henry Adams and you might get the sense of Kennan here: elegant, subtle, elitist, and horrified by the ideological convulsions that have engulfed his world. (Book-of-the- Month Club and History Book Club selections)"
Forty glittering, insightful essays, speeches, and reviews on the tumultuous 20th century, from nonagenarian Kennan, the dean of diplomatic historians (Around the Cragged Hill, 1993; Sketches from a Life, 1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KENNAN DIARIES by Frank Costigliola
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2014

"Students of modern history will take great interest in this work, which ably straddles the frontiers of the personal, political and philosophical."
One of 20th-century America's most significant diplomats offers a window into his inner life and private concerns, fears and dreams. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 11, 1993

"He presents some valuable policy suggestions toward book's end, but, most of the way, he seems asleep at the wheel."
The former foreign-service officer, professor at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, and author of 18 books now offers The World According to Kennan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKETCHES FROM A LIFE by George F. Kennan
Released: May 22, 1989

Kennan, one of the "six wise men" who helped shape the postwar world, author of The Cloud of Danger, The Nuclear Delusion, and 14 others, demonstrates in this selection of journal entries dining as far back as six decades the breadth of his wisdom in foreign policy and other matters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1997

"A simple but illuminating exposition."
By distinguished diplomat and Cold War policy architect Kennan (At the Century's Ending, 1996, etc.) with some input from historian Lukacs (The End of the Twentieth Century, 1993), some brief ruminations on the evolution of America's containment policy in the early years of the Cold War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 5, 1992

"Awash with lengthy digressions, but Will's argument is clear and persuasive nonetheless."
Will (Suddenly, 1990, etc.) weighs in for term limits as the answer to congressional careerism and public disgust. ``A permanent class of career legislators is inherently inimical to limited government,'' says Will in this carefully argued and historically grounded work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 12, 1990

A collection of Will's Washington Post syndicated columns from the past four years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 22, 1994

"Articulately partisan critiques of the volatile and evolving state of the union."
Another 175 pieces of Will's lively, inquiring mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 1997

"Nonetheless, a significant reappraisal of a major, often neglected, moviemaker. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An effective, in-depth evaluation of the life and work of the master movie mogul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 1997

"One can only hope his work will inspire serious thought—and not just squeals of pleasure—from his like- minded colleagues. (Author tour)"
Excellent tonic for those fans of the popular pundit (The Levelling Wind, 1994, etc.) who prefer to ingest his brand of conservatism in large doses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A NICE LITTLE PLACE ON THE NORTH SIDE by George F. Will
NON-FICTION
Released: March 25, 2014

"Digressive, amusing, anecdotal, legend-shattering, self-deprecating and passionate—just what you want in a friend sitting beside you at the ballpark."
Veteran conservative political pundit Will (One Man's America: The Pleasures and Provocations of Our Singular Nation, 2009, etc.) writes an affectionate birthday card to the home of his beloved Chicago Cubs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 29, 1998

"Unfortunately, though they make a few salient points, Baker and Dessart fail at their ultimate goal: The problems of television remain poorly identified, and the solutions offered seem unrealistic."
Two television veterans address the decay of a medium but cannot come up with clear, substantive solutions to its problems. Read full book review >