Search Results: "Georges Passelecq"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HIDDEN ENCYCLICAL OF PIUS XI by Georges Passelecq
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Garry Wills contributes a foreword to this work, which, at a time when the Catholic Church is considering the canonization of Pius XII, may force Catholics and others to reassess his moral failure in a time of crisis."
Certain to reopen the debate on the political, diplomatic, and, most importantly, moral failure of the Catholic Church in the face of fascism and the Holocaust. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUSPECT by Georges Simenon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Dull and repetitive in its endless descriptions of seedy, waterfront bars, even seedier rooming houses, and shabby, truculent characters; only Chave's sweet, stubborn persona makes this story, first published in 1938, mildly palatable."
An overextended look at the terrorist underworld of Paris in the Thirties, seen through the eyes of sentimental Pierre Chave—an armchair anarchist, AWOL from the French Army, who's now living a quiet life in Brussels with his wife, young son, and subsistence job. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAIGRET AT THE GAI-MOULIN by Georges Simenon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Not one of Maigret's more brilliant triumphs but interesting for its penetrating character studies—especially of those teenagers in deep trouble."
In this brief novel, first published in 1940, Inspector Maigret goes undercover to solve a murder in the Belgian city of Liäge, where the body of Greek playboy Ephraim Graphopoulos has been found, stuffed in a wicker basket, at the town zoo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VOID by Georges Perec
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 19, 1995

"A mind-blowing feat of writing and translation."
The late French linguistic virtuoso Perec (193682; Things and A Man Asleep, 1990, etc.), wrote this brilliant book that contains not one letter E (we kid you not) in 1969, and, until now, no one was up to this extreme translating challenge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 14, 2000

"A must for any library—and a wonderful gift for anthropologists, ethnographers, cultural historians, and quiz kids."
Ifrah's monumental follow-up to From One to Zero (1993) goes from one to (almost) infinity as he meticulously reviews the numbers and reckoning systems of countless tribes and cultures in a dazzling scholarly performance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CATTLE CAR by Georges Hyvernaud
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1997

"But the book isn't at all hermetic: It is further enlivened by vividly drawn characters and a commonsensical appreciation of the mundane satisfactions of simply making do and getting by."
The Cattle Car ($49.95; paper $15.95; June 1997; 154 pp.; 0-8101-6030-7; paper 0-8101-6031-5): Another view of WW II and its aftermath, in the first English translation of a novel (originally published in 1953 in France) by a critic and teacher who therein turned his own experiences and his reflections on them into a seductive metafiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 5, 1999

"It may be too thorough for the casual reader, but gory anecdotes and effective reference to overarching intellectual trends make the book edifying and morbidly enjoyable."
Minois's book follows the religious, philosophical, literary, and judicial debate for and against self-murder from antiquity to the end of the Enlightenment, demonstrating the close connection between political power, religious authority, social status, and the freedom to die. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAIGRET AND THE SATURDAY CALLER by Georges Simenon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1991

"This brief novel, published in the US for the first time, is low-keyed, swift-moving, psychologically acute, and absorbing throughout."
Chief Inspector Maigret, looking forward to dinner and TV after a hard day, finds waiting at home for him instead one Leonard Planchonan undersized, harelipped, introverted house-painter with an outsized problem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALLING DR. LAURA by Nicole J. Georges
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 22, 2013

"The mostly engaging tone and humor can't compensate for a lack of substance and continuity."
A meandering graphic memoir by a young cartoonist who seems to have most of her story ahead of her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNDER SATAN’S SUN by Georges Bernanos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2001

"Not all readers will agree, but Under Satan's Sun should not be missed."
First published in 1926 and long unavailable in English translation, this vivid debut novel by the eminent French Catholic author (1888-1948) is a solid stepping-stone pointing toward the greater achievements of Bernanos's Diary of a Country Priest and The Impostor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE IMPOSTOR by Georges Bernanos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 11, 1999

"An often maddeningly discursive work that, nevertheless, accumulates great power in a devastating portrayal of a tormented soul that itself becomes a tormentor."
A new translation of an early (1927) novel by the French author (1888—1948) of at least one masterpiece, The Diary of a Country Priest, among numerous other intense explorations of the doctrinal intricacies and psychic burdens of the Catholicism that was his lifelong theme. Read full book review >