Search Results: "Gerald Guerlais"


BOOK REVIEW

A CATFISH TALE by Whitney Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2014

"This fresh Cajun twist on an archetypal tale will win fans down the bayou and well beyond. (glossary, seafood gumbo recipe) (Picture book/fairy tale. 4-8)"
A saucy version of the traditional tale of the fisherman and his wife, set in the Louisiana bayou. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHIP OF LOST SOULS by Rachelle Delaney
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 5, 2012

"Echoes of Peter Pan notwithstanding, a less-than-seaworthy outing. (map, glossary) (Adventure. 10-12)"
Endowed with the trappings of a comedic pirate yarn but not its heart, this series opener focuses more on one character's soul-searching than nautical action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLEASE PLEASE THE BEES by Gerald Kelley
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 11, 2017

"This indeed should please the bees! (Picture book. 4-8)"
From his morning toast with honey to a last cup of tea with honey at bedtime, Benedict's fondness for the sticky stuff defines just about everything he does. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEY by Gerald McDermott
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2011

"This final volume in McDermott's sextet of trickster tales is as full of kid appeal and entertaining as the rest and, like them, will power many an energetic read-aloud. (Picture book/folktale. 5-10)"
Monkey wants some mangoes and Crocodile wants some monkey—and neither is about to give up in this traditional Indian trickster tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CREATION by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Accessible to small children but resonant enough for older ones, reverent and magnificent. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-10)"
Decades of turning myth into gorgeously imaged picture books culminates in McDermott's powerful rendering of the creation story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 25, 1989

An entertaining and illuminating celebration of the entrepreneurial spirit as an engine of America's socioeconomic growth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

1927 by Gerald Leinwand
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 2001

"Heavyweight research, lightweight analysis. (12 b&w photos)"
A freelance educator and historian (The Pageant of World History, not reviewed) offers the social and political history of a single year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLING INTO MONAGHAN by Gerald Hull
Released: May 22, 2000

"When Hull separates showing from telling, these poems work, but mostly they leave you wanting."
Contemplations of Irish land and life by a poet of mixed descent with mixed feelings and mixed results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUN FLIGHT by Gerald McDermott
Released: May 30, 1980

"Overall, both the telling and the pictures have a distancing effect."
In this version of the Daedalus and Icarus story, McDermott returns to the lush sun and earth colors of Arrow to the Sun, but adds a good share of sparkling Aegean blue and a dramatic black background for his blue and violet labyrinth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

. . . TO BE A HORSEMAN by Gerald Beck
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 31, 2013

"An intriguing, if occasionally rambling, tale of a sometimes-solitary life."
A thoughtful memoir about growing up on a ranch in the mountains of Northern California, punctuated with philosophical musings on societal changes over the past seven decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEARNED HAND by Gerald Gunther
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 2, 1994

"An important work on an important figure, despite its reflection of the built-in prejudice of the biographer, who served as Hand's law clerk."
An exhaustive and affectionate, albeit admittedly biased, account of the life and legal work of one of the nation's greatest jurists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 18, 1977

"Eye-catching to be sure, the pictures are least effective—even ludicrous—when they come closest to depicting narrative action (see the queen of Byblos rushing into a chamber as her baby cries, Osiris' eye peeks foolishly from a column, and Isis, in a blue, snakelike swish, changes from woman to bird)—and totally unresponsive to any changes in mood."
McDermott's latest venture in world mythology employs the Egyptian story of how Osiris the Pharaoh became Osiris god of the underworld—after his envious brother Set ("the animal headed one") traps him in a coffin-like chest and later chops him to bits. Read full book review >