Search Results: "Gerald N. Grob"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 15, 1994

"Clear, engaging account of a persistent social problem, full of humanity and wisdom."
An informative survey of America's evolving responses to the question of society's obligation to the mentally ill and how best to meet that obligation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A wealth of information for students of American history and the history of medicine."
An erudite, thoroughly researched account of how infectious diseases and chronic illnesses have evolved in America, from pre-Columbian times to the present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INFECTION by Gerald N. Callahan
NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 2006

"Although Callahan's recitation of statistics occasionally becomes tedious, human-interest stories and vivid accounts of historic events enliven his text."
The good, the bad and the ugly in the world of infection, introducing the microorganisms that are essential to life, those that complicate it and those with the potential to destroy it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A fine addition to the body of work by a proven master. (Picture book/folktale. 5-8)"
Jabutí, the flute-playing tortoise, may not be as well known in North America as some of his fellow tricksters like Coyote or Ananse, but there are many stories about him in Amazonian folklore, first recorded as long ago as 1875. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZOMO THE RABBIT by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

A rabbit asks the sky god for wisdom, and learns that he must first fool three animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 20, 1974

"McDermott's fusion of primitive costumes, motifs and legend with contemporary design and color sense is highly ambitious — and, in this instance, explosively, elementally beautiful."
The gold, ochre and black of the stylized pueblo, the Boy's transformation from a Kachina-like silhouette into an arrow strong enough to reach his father the Sun and, finally, the explosion of color as Boy enters the Sun's four chambers to confront monster lions, serpents, bees and lightning — all add up to a richer, more kinetic, more functional balance between story and visual effects than were to be found in McDermott's highly praised Anansi the Spider. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIG-BOY by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2009

"Good rascally fun. (Picture book/folktale. 3-5)"
Joining McDermott's other trickster tales meant for keiki ("very young children" in the Hawaiian language) is the tale of the shape-shifting pig whose annoying and greedy habits land him in endless trouble with both the king and the goddess Pele. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WHOLE STUPID WAY WE ARE by N. Griffin
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"Readers who invest in this quirky set of characters and circumstances will be rewarded. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
The friendship between optimistic Dinah Beach and depressed, nihilistic Skint Gilbert is tested in a carefully crafted and highly stylized tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEGEND OF THE KING by Gerald Morris
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Well done. (end note, cast list) (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Morris pulls off a spectacular conclusion to his humane and witty Squire's Tales series as destructive intrigues both provide a backdrop for a fan-pleasing reunion of favorite figures from past episodes and lead up to the final battle between Arthur and his brilliant, hideously warped son Mordred. Read full book review >