Search Results: "Gerald Vizenor"


BOOK REVIEW

HOTLINE HEALERS by Gerald Vizenor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 12, 1997

"Some loose ends and a fondness for narrative loops are drawbacks, but the novel also draws real strength from its style and wit; those acclimated to Vizenor's eclecticism will find much here to enjoy."
In his unique satiric style, at once lyrical and salted with allusion and self-reference, Vizenor (Dead Voices, 1992, etc.) savages academics and lampoons Anglo-Americans generally for their interference with and misperception of Native American reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A witty but serious warning."
The creatures of Native American myth and the urban realities of Oakland, California, come together in Vizenor's (The Heirs of Columbus, 1991, etc.) latest excursion, making full use of his penchant for transforming the commonplace into the mysterious and comic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEIRS OF COLUMBUS by Gerald Vizenor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 23, 1991

"Not as easy a read as the much-ballyhooed The Crown of Columbus, but more deeply satisfying."
A comic mythology of Columbus that—though it sags in places with repetition and academic padding—offers enough tall-tale fun to make for inventive entertainment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEY by Gerald McDermott
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2011

"This final volume in McDermott's sextet of trickster tales is as full of kid appeal and entertaining as the rest and, like them, will power many an energetic read-aloud. (Picture book/folktale. 5-10)"
Monkey wants some mangoes and Crocodile wants some monkey—and neither is about to give up in this traditional Indian trickster tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CREATION by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Accessible to small children but resonant enough for older ones, reverent and magnificent. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-10)"
Decades of turning myth into gorgeously imaged picture books culminates in McDermott's powerful rendering of the creation story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A fine addition to the body of work by a proven master. (Picture book/folktale. 5-8)"
Jabutí, the flute-playing tortoise, may not be as well known in North America as some of his fellow tricksters like Coyote or Ananse, but there are many stories about him in Amazonian folklore, first recorded as long ago as 1875. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZOMO THE RABBIT by Gerald McDermott
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

A rabbit asks the sky god for wisdom, and learns that he must first fool three animals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 20, 1974

"McDermott's fusion of primitive costumes, motifs and legend with contemporary design and color sense is highly ambitious — and, in this instance, explosively, elementally beautiful."
The gold, ochre and black of the stylized pueblo, the Boy's transformation from a Kachina-like silhouette into an arrow strong enough to reach his father the Sun and, finally, the explosion of color as Boy enters the Sun's four chambers to confront monster lions, serpents, bees and lightning — all add up to a richer, more kinetic, more functional balance between story and visual effects than were to be found in McDermott's highly praised Anansi the Spider. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEGEND OF THE KING by Gerald Morris
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Well done. (end note, cast list) (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Morris pulls off a spectacular conclusion to his humane and witty Squire's Tales series as destructive intrigues both provide a backdrop for a fan-pleasing reunion of favorite figures from past episodes and lead up to the final battle between Arthur and his brilliant, hideously warped son Mordred. Read full book review >