Search Results: "Gerard Jones"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 2004

"Bold and brassy, with a solid grasp of its material."
An industry long in the shadows gets its due with a mainstream historical text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VISIONS OF GERARD by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1963

"And may he find the turn-off on the thruway."
As a writer, Kerouac is becoming more and more like the sad sack who missed the turn-off on the thruway and must now seemingly go on and on until he hits the next one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Competent but uneven, and perhaps overly demanding of the most popular form of American TV as sociological oracle. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
An I Love Lucy to Cheers run-through of sitcom as both product and ``foggy'' mirror of our corporate culture, by the coauthor of The Beaver Papers and The Comic Book Heroes (neither reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 27, 1991

"Along with sympathy, tact, appreciation, and humor, Martin brings new information from previously unpublished sources to elucidate the shadows in which Hopkins's life and poetry had been enfolded by well-meaning friends, scholars, and the critics who have made an industry of him."
Martin (English/Princeton) brings his ranging knowledge of English Victorian life and his understanding of the poetic sensibility (Tennyson, 1980; With Friends Possessed: A Life of Edward Fitzgerald, 1985) to the subtle, obscure, introverted, and spare life and works of Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89), the Jesuit priest whose work, published first in 1918, 29 years after his death, is considered as influential as T.S. Eliot's in initiating the modern movement in poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JASPER JONES by Craig Silvey
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 12, 2011

"A richly rewarding exploration of truth and lies by a masterful storyteller. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Charlie is catapulted into adulthood when Jasper Jones knocks on his window on a blisteringly hot Australian night and leads him to a hidden glade where a girl is hanging from a tree, bruised and bloody. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIPPYJON JONES by Judy Schachner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Both feline hero and story are full of beans (more Mexican-jumping than pinto) but ay caramba, mucho fun. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Skippyjon Jones insists he's not a Siamese cat despite ears too big for his head and a head too big for his body. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHUCK JONES by Hugh Kenner
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The other two are Greg Sarris's Mabel McKay: Weaving the Dream, profiling the Pomo basket weaver and medicine woman, and Yvonne Fern's Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation, a discussion with the creator of Star Trek."
Dr. Seuss created the Grinch, but it took Chuck Jones to make him move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS by Paul Mariani
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 2008

"A revealing portrait of a unique talent, a deeply religious artist who saw God's wonder and mystery in all."
The intensely private, pious, sometimes melancholic and tortured life of the English Jesuit whose remarkable poems did not appear until a quarter-century after his death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEARLESS JONES by Walter Mosley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2001

Even before sultry Elana Love walks into mild-mannered Paris Minton's life three months after his Watts bookstore opens, Mosley can't resist his signature scene: A pair of cops stroll into the shop determined to push Paris around just because he's a black man and it's 1954. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CASEY JONES by Allan Drummond
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 2001

Casey Jones, the King of the Iron Horse when the railroads ruled the land, gets polished to a hero's gleam in Drummond's rhymed telling of the stormy night he died. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Many of the jokes work, but too often Kelly seems like a desperate comedian, pulling out joy buzzers and chattering teeth and one rubber chicken too many. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
It's hard to believe a book could contain too many chickens, but this novel may test readers' patience. Read full book review >