Search Results: "Gerard O'Neill"


BOOK REVIEW

EUGENE O'NEILL by Stephen A. Black
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"O'Neill proves a fascinating, if morbid, traveling companion, and Black a capable and erudite cicerone. (40 illus.)"
Mourning may become Electra, but it served equally well for O'Neill, who, as Black (English/Simon Fraser Univ.) contends in this massive biography, worked through his personal tragedies by recasting them for the stage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EUGENE O'NEILL by Robert M. Dowling
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"Although O'Neill claimed he was a 'tragic optimist,' Dowling's sympathetic, comprehensive portrait reveals a man beset by self-hatred and despair, struggling—and failing—to find salvation."
A portrait of a playwright inspired by suffering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 27, 1991

"Along with sympathy, tact, appreciation, and humor, Martin brings new information from previously unpublished sources to elucidate the shadows in which Hopkins's life and poetry had been enfolded by well-meaning friends, scholars, and the critics who have made an industry of him."
Martin (English/Princeton) brings his ranging knowledge of English Victorian life and his understanding of the poetic sensibility (Tennyson, 1980; With Friends Possessed: A Life of Edward Fitzgerald, 1985) to the subtle, obscure, introverted, and spare life and works of Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89), the Jesuit priest whose work, published first in 1918, 29 years after his death, is considered as influential as T.S. Eliot's in initiating the modern movement in poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VISIONS OF GERARD by Jack Kerouac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1963

"And may he find the turn-off on the thruway."
As a writer, Kerouac is becoming more and more like the sad sack who missed the turn-off on the thruway and must now seemingly go on and on until he hits the next one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS by Paul Mariani
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 3, 2008

"A revealing portrait of a unique talent, a deeply religious artist who saw God's wonder and mystery in all."
The intensely private, pious, sometimes melancholic and tortured life of the English Jesuit whose remarkable poems did not appear until a quarter-century after his death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF ROSE O'NEILL by Rose O'Neill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Florid writing and lack of drama rule out a popular readership, though as a record of the artistic concerns of a distinctive woman and shaper of popular sensibilities, it may be useful for historians. (15 illustrations, not seen)"
This memoir by the creator of the once popular Kewpie figure lacks the literary strength to raise it above a mere curiosity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"Very slow-moving, but informative."
A biography of the only mapmaker nonspecialists are likely to have heard of. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNSHINE STATE by Sarah Gerard
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 11, 2017

"An intimate journey reveals a Florida few visitors would ever discover."
Decidedly odd characters emerge in eight autobiographical essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG IRELANDERS by Gerard Donovan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2008

"Gemlike stories that focus on contemporary issues in Ireland."
Donovan (Sunless, 2007, etc.) provides quiet stories of place and displacement, of relationships and disruption. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCHOPENHAUER’S TELESCOPE by Gerard Donovan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2003

"Overconstructed but intermittently superb: an ambitious if flawed debut from a promising writer."
Two men, one digging a hole, the other watching and talking, lay out the history of man's cruelty to man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DR. MORTIMER AND THE ALDGATE MYSTERY by Gerard Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 20, 2001

"Here, the good doctor attends young Lavinia Nancarrow only to discover that her influenza is less threatening than the sinister guardian who, in the best tradition of 'The Copper Beeches' and 'The Greek Interpreter,' is keeping her imprisoned in an Aldgate house."
Through a chronological accident worthy of Dr. Watson, this inaugural adventure of Dr. James Mortimer, the physician whose main claim to fame before this year was leaving a cane behind in Sherlock Holmes's rooms in The Hound of the Baskervilles, has already been preceded by his second (Dr. Mortimer and the Barking Man Mystery, p. 299). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Published in conjunction with the UN Conference on Environment and Development, Piel's scenario depends on much human goodwill and longer-range self-interest—and wouldn't that be nice?"
Saturated with facts but consistently engaging and readable, Piel's prescription for global salvation marshals history, anthropology, economics, and ecology to demonstrate the measures necessary to create an equitable and sustainable economy—one that's capable of absorbing a final doubling of the world's human population. Read full book review >