Search Results: "Giles Milton"


BOOK REVIEW

MILTON by Anna Beer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"A well-researched, graceful account of the life of a literary giant."
Rich, often laudatory biography of the creator of Paradise Lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An exciting, suspenseful tale of international intrigue."
An elegant presentation of Winston Churchill's special guerrilla operations force, which consistently met the dirty exigencies of war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN CHURCHILL SLAUGHTERED SHEEP AND STALIN ROBBED A BANK by Giles Milton
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Perfect for bathroom reading or a doctor's waiting room."
The British journalist continues to collect little-known events and factoids from history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2008

"Teaches a lesson that needs repeating: Genocide is never the work of a few perverted individuals but springs from common patriotism accompanied by intense hatred of national enemies."
Gripping account of a half-forgotten 20th-century war that ended in gruesome ethnic cleansing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMURAI WILLIAM by Giles Milton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 2003

"A remarkable tale that might have fallen from the inventive lips of Scheherazade. (3 maps, 47 illustrations)"
Popular historian Milton (The Riddle and the Knight, 2001, etc.) returns with another page-turner: a chronicle of the actual events underlying James Clavell's novel Shogun (1975). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN HITLER TOOK COCAINE AND LENIN LOST HIS BRAIN by Giles Milton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"A few chapters will elicit a response of 'so what?' But there's enough adventure, gore, and mystery to make this volume mostly entertaining."
Hitler's love child and other shocking speculations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 11, 2011

"A fine addition to the dwindling number of firsthand World War II personal stories."
Discovering that his father-in-law, a celebrated artist named Wolfram, endured a long, miserable experience in the Wehrmacht, popular historian Giles (Paradise Lost: Smyrna, 1922, 2008, etc.) suspected correctly that he had material for a fresh look at a familiar genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"A diverting if slightly underdone effort."
Originally published in Britain in 1996, this trek in the footsteps of a medieval Englishman created the template for Milton's later studies of historic journeys (Nathaniel's Nutmeg, 1999; Big Chief Elizabeth, 2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2014

"A beguiling ride through a riotous time by a historian and able storyteller who knows his facts and his audience."
This chronicle of British undercover push back against Bolshevik world conspiracy proves to be an exciting ringside seat at the Russian Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Diligent scholarship and brilliant storytelling: a fascinating study that dispels many popular myths regarding America's colonization."
A spellbinding narrative on the preliminary attempts at colonization of North America by the British. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"Milton is a storyteller of the first rank, with a knack for quick character sketches, an eye for what is important and what is dross, and a refreshing sense of humor, even amid the smoke and ruin he so well describes."
Milton (The Riddle and the Knight, not reviewed) deftly and arrestingly captures the sorry history of the European lust for nutmeg and its devastating impact on the Spice Islands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALL ME GORGEOUS! by Giles Milton
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"The endpapers hold full images of each of the 11 animals whose parts make up our winged, beaked, antlered and spiny Gorgeous. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The creature that inhabits these pages (the ending tag line is the title) is gorgeous indeed, and it is displayed in an inventive piece of bookmaking. Read full book review >