Search Results: "Gina Kolata"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 18, 1999

"Kolata's is a knowledgeable voice, and her enthusiasm for the chase draws us into the intrigue. Her frightening conclusion? It could happen again, at any time."
A still-unsolved medical mystery, expertly told: What caused the influenza pandemic of 1918, a disaster that dwarfs every other epidemic in this century? And could it happen again? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"Easy reading packed with information that, without inflicting guilt on couch potatoes, suggests that maybe they've been missing out on a lot of fun."
New York Times science reporter Kolata (Flu, 1999, etc.) takes a revealing look at the myths and misunderstandings about what exercise can do for you. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 21, 2017

"The panic is palpable in Kolata's moving depiction of a mysterious disease and its frightening consequences."
A family's legacy is haunted by a torturous genetic disease. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"All the more reason the book should appeal to readers who want to learn the facts and think for themselves. (Author tour)"
Not a quickie to exploit the news sensation of the year, Kolata's review of the before-during-and-aftermath of the cloning of a Scottish sheep is a well-researched account of critical events in the history of embryology and developmental biology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2007

"Offers many insights into the world of obesity research and the minds of dieters, but provides small comfort for anyone hoping to discover the fountain of thinness."
A dose of reality for would-be dieters, laced with a dash of history, science and sociology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UP AND AT ‘EM WITH WINNIE AND ERNST by Gina Freschet
ANIMALS
Released: March 14, 2005

"The humorous situations and amusing illustrations will leave them ready for more. (Fiction. 5-8)"
Best pals Winnie and Ernst have each other's back at all times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WASTE OF SPACE by Gina Damico
YOUNG ADULT
Released: July 11, 2017

"Like the TV show it's about, nothing in this novel is as it seems, but the journey to discover the truth is out of this world. (Fiction. 12-18)"
Ten teenagers are launched into "space" to entertain insatiable TV audiences in Damico's satirical novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"A comprehensive, passionate, and thought-provoking look through the door into a brave new world in which we may find ourselves before we realize it."
The perfectibility of the human species remains one of the most controversial subjects in science, and Maranto, an award- winning science writer, explains why. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1994

"Male readers intrigued by the title may feel misled, for these are not sex kittens but opinionated, articulate, and uninhibited feminists sounding off to each other. (B&w drawings, not seen)"
Freely reconstructed conversations between a feminist sex researcher and women who love sex and love talking about it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEOPLE I WANTED TO BE by Gina Ochsner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 11, 2005

"Eleven stories that possess restraint and edge: a powerful combination."
Elegantly unsettling fiction by Flannery O'Connor Award winner Ochsner (The Necessary Grace to Fall, 2002), who charts some strange goings-on within emigrant communities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIXTY-EIGHT ROOMS by Marianne Malone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 2010

"Predictable but pleasant. (Magical adventure. 8-12)"
Who hasn't seen the carefully composed exhibits of miniatures at a museum, or even a simple dollhouse, and wondered what it would be like to be small enough to walk inside? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNDAY’S SILENCE by Gina B. Nahai
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Well intentioned, though the tale—partly of Appalachia, partly of Middle East—loses more strength than it gains through being double-stranded."
A sensitive if uncompelling exploration of cultural alienation: an abandoned son searches for understanding and redemption after his snake-handling father is fatally bitten. Read full book review >