Search Results: "Grady Klein"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 2006

"An unusual take on American history and colonial experience, Klein's first graphic novel, while aspirant, may not hold wide audience appeal. (Graphic novel. YA)"
In this brightly colored and busily illustrated graphic novel, Klein introduces young Bertha "Birdy" Snodgrass. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST COLONY: BOOK 3 by Grady Klein
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Visually engaging, but otherwise an utter mess."
An absurdly whimsical graphic novel devised with more style than substance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"Laugh-a-minute or not, an accessible introduction to a densely complex subject."
A lighthearted effort to make the dismal science less dismal, though too often about as funny as a Yakov Smirnoff set. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE KLEIN by Anne Ylvisaker
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Instead of a typical boy-and-his-dog story, the author has created something unique and memorable. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Little Klein, aka Harold, is definitely the runt of the litter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 23, 2015

"Klein changed the way rock does business. In this balanced, fascinating, and well-written biography, Goodman gives him credit where it's due."
The story of a manager more often vilified than any other in the history of rock. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDROMEDA KLEIN by Frank Portman
FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 2009

"Alas, the conclusion (satisfying but easy, with a frustrating and unnecessary near-magical disability cure) is a rush job after hundreds of pages of meandering magickal confusion. (Supernatural. 12-14)"
A disappointing second outing from the author of King Dork (2006) introduces Andromeda Klein, teenage occultist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELANIE KLEIN by Julia Kristeva
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Of much substance, though of interest to a very small readership."
The second installment, of more narrow interest than her Hannah Arendt (p. 787), in postmodern pioneer Kristeva's planned three-volume triptych on female geniuses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARTOON INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS by Grady Klein
NON-FICTION
Released: July 2, 2013

"Well-suited to middle and high schoolers as well as to adults seeking to brush up their statistical skills without breaking a sweat."
A gentle, pleasantly illustrated induction into the strange world of bell curves and chi squares. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CARTOON INTRODUCTION TO CLIMATE CHANGE by Yoram Bauman
NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 2014

"Though the book's approach is entertaining, its message is nonetheless urgent."
An often amusing graphic primer about an issue the authors recognize as apocalyptically serious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUEST FOR ANNA KLEIN by Thomas H. Cook
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 21, 2011

"A knight errant, a labyrinth of deceit, a sure bestseller."
Edgar-nominee Cook (The Last Talk with Lola Faye, 2010, etc.) plays the spy game in this mystery adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2006

"They will also leave readers profoundly affected by not only the dangers of these often-unpredictable potential pandemics, but by the complex challenges facing medical professionals who fight to understand and contain them. (source notes, Internet resources, further reading) (Nonfiction. 11-13)"
Grady, author of a number of New York Times articles on the topic, describes in personal, sometimes-heartrending detail her 2005 visit to Angola to cover the outbreak of Marburg fever there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIVER OF DARKNESS by James Grady
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 16, 1991

"A brooding, ambitious, and rather long wrap-up of everything awful in the American spy business."
The secret war in Laos, the Kurds, the cold war, the drug war, Watergate, and Iran-contra are among the submerged stumps and sand bars here through which paddle sundry good and evil employees of the American intelligence industry. Read full book review >