Search Results: "Graham Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1974

"In the words of a contemporary, Rochester lived 'as a torch to light himself to Hell thereby' and Greene charts his passage to that fiery place with the taut, restrained compassion which he always extends to fallen idols and angels."
This, the life of John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester (1647-1680), is Graham Greene's only biographical venture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MINISTRY OF FEAR by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1943

"Ingenious intrigue, handled with fastidious finish."
Less bizarre than Brighton Rock or Thy Labyrinthine Ways, this is a return to the straight mystery novel which in Greene's hands is always something more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAPTAIN AND THE ENEMY by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Expert and fluent prose flawlessly evokes a world of British eccentricity and international political madness."
This truly odd and strangely affecting love story by the modern master begins as a quirky narrative of life in the English demimonde and ends pure Greene—a tale of modern espionage, marked by unclear alliances and shadowy double-dealing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SORT OF LIFE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1971

"Perhaps it will not come on strongly enough for those who are not already among Graham Greene's admirers, but most readers will be gratified that he has searched his memory which is 'like a long broken night."
Mr. Greene's fractional biography — his sort of life is only a part of a life up through the publication of his early, forgotten novels — is a reproof of Auden's overreaching contention that "biographies of writers, whether written by others or themselves, are always superfluous and usually in bad taste." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUMAN FACTOR by Graham Greene
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1978

"What remains is a story as apparently plain as Greene's perfect prose—an open-hearted, tight-lipped pavane of conscience and sentiment that can be watched and enjoyed for all the wrong, and all the right, reasons."
A man in love walks through the world like an anarchist, carrying a time bomb." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANOTHER MEXICO by Graham Greene
Released: June 5, 1939

"Particular market — the Catholics who want food for their wrath."
A Catholic tours Mexico and finds little to his liking, and plenty to condemn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONFIDENTIAL AGENT by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 1939

"Greene does a superior job, and the growing horror as hero becomes hemmed in by entangling net of intrigue is exciting."
Though this is straight international-adventure stuff, Greene lifts it from worn ruts by cutting out glamorous trappings and substituting a loyal, conscientious agent who gets pushed around just once too often and turns on the pack. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S A BATTLEFIELD by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 21, 1934

"London today, with cuts from various social strata."
Not a mystery story, but will appeal to those mystery fans who liked BEFORE THE FACT, and THE PARADINE CASE, though there is less of continuity of thought and plot, and more of the flashlight treatment of his earlier book, ORIENT EXPRESS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUIET AMERICAN by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 1956

"It should assure a wider audience than Robert Shaplen's A Forest of Tigers (Knopf) which deals with this theme and this part of the world."
........ is a disquieting examination of a central, contemporary issue, and substitutes political conscience for the spiritual concern of Greene's recent vela but the battleground is still a highly personal terrain- and an individual is the chief casualty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1951

"For an appreciative, rather than an appreciable, market."
A collection of short places, largely critical, occasionally autobiographical, which provide a commentary of personal perception and original insight and subtle stimulus on the passing literary scene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 14, 1973

"There is also an inductive introduction by Mr. Greene on how he now views the short story and on some of the curious circumstances in which a few of them were conceived."
Forty in all, representing a forty-year span, "a collection of escapes from the novelist's world" and combining those which appeared in May We Borrow Your Husband?, A Sense of Reality, Twenty-One Stories, as well as three which appear in book form for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1980

"So: not the memoir some might hope for—even less a sort of life than A Sort of Life (1971)—but, on its own terms, sufficiently alluring."
In no sense an autobiography—"Those parts of a life most beloved of columnists remain outside the scope of this book"—this is a suavely arranged, roughly chronological group of personal essays, most of them previously published: the introductions to the British collected edition of Greene's oeuvre; reportage from international trouble spots (Greene has sought peril as one "way of escape" from a vaguely defined angst); salutes to two or three friends; plus a few anecdotes and reflections. Read full book review >