Search Results: "Graham Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MINISTRY OF FEAR by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1943

"Ingenious intrigue, handled with fastidious finish."
Less bizarre than Brighton Rock or Thy Labyrinthine Ways, this is a return to the straight mystery novel which in Greene's hands is always something more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S A BATTLEFIELD by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1962

"And while appreciably less popular in character than much that he has written, Greene's more serious readership will welcome its reappearance and find it a subtle, serious commentary."
This early (1934) Graham Greene novel is being republished here for the first time, along with a new introduction in which Greene states that this fifth book was the least read of any of his novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1974

"In the words of a contemporary, Rochester lived 'as a torch to light himself to Hell thereby' and Greene charts his passage to that fiery place with the taut, restrained compassion which he always extends to fallen idols and angels."
This, the life of John Wilmot, Second Earl of Rochester (1647-1680), is Graham Greene's only biographical venture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE TRAIN by Graham Greene
Released: June 21, 1974

"The deliberate old fashioned innocence of Ardizzone's style provides just the disarming touch that both stories need, though the Fire Engine gives the illustrator more opportunity to vary the scene and the cast and is thus less confining both in looks and in message."
First published in 1946 with different illustrations, The Little Train is the sort of cute little cautionary tale that even a Graham Greene couldn't get away with today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SORT OF LIFE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1971

"Perhaps it will not come on strongly enough for those who are not already among Graham Greene's admirers, but most readers will be gratified that he has searched his memory which is 'like a long broken night."
Mr. Greene's fractional biography — his sort of life is only a part of a life up through the publication of his early, forgotten novels — is a reproof of Auden's overreaching contention that "biographies of writers, whether written by others or themselves, are always superfluous and usually in bad taste." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOURNEY WITHOUT MAPS by Graham Greene
Released: Nov. 6, 1936

"So he went — down the African coast, inland with guides. And this is the story. There's amazing vitality, a contagion of enthusiasm, in the telling. There is somewhat the bite in describing conditions that characterized Africa Dances. There is much of what he found there — there is much of the man himself, through anecdotes and commentary on life. More than a travel book, but sell as travel and autobiography-"
The novelist (Orient Express, The Man Within) was obsessed by the idea that he must go to Liberia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAPTAIN AND THE ENEMY by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1988

"Expert and fluent prose flawlessly evokes a world of British eccentricity and international political madness."
This truly odd and strangely affecting love story by the modern master begins as a quirky narrative of life in the English demimonde and ends pure Greene—a tale of modern espionage, marked by unclear alliances and shadowy double-dealing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BURNT-OUT CASE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 17, 1960

"Strong publisher backing and the author's name assure initial attention."
Almost all of Greene's serious works have been framed within the context of Catholicism, and while intimations of grace and disgrace hover over his new book here, there is no sterner conflict-no deadlock between the flesh and the faith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE BY GRAHAM GREENE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 1952

"The Ministry of Fear."
Three "entertainments" as Graham Greene defines his earlier thrillers, will introduce a new Greene to many who have "discovered" him with his serious psychological novels and his critical writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUMAN FACTOR by Graham Greene
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1978

"What remains is a story as apparently plain as Greene's perfect prose—an open-hearted, tight-lipped pavane of conscience and sentiment that can be watched and enjoyed for all the wrong, and all the right, reasons."
A man in love walks through the world like an anarchist, carrying a time bomb." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SENSE OF REALITY by Graham Greene
Released: June 21, 1963

"These serious overtones qualify the collection as more than light entertainment, which it also is, although it may ultimately prove to be only peripheral as a part of this writer's permanent collection."
Three short stories, and one which is actually a novella, are affiliated by their concern with the intangible and illusory and they sometimes cross over into less finite areas where reality is blurred by fantasy, memory and myth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONFIDENTIAL AGENT by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 1939

"Greene does a superior job, and the growing horror as hero becomes hemmed in by entangling net of intrigue is exciting."
Though this is straight international-adventure stuff, Greene lifts it from worn ruts by cutting out glamorous trappings and substituting a loyal, conscientious agent who gets pushed around just once too often and turns on the pack. Read full book review >