Search Results: "Graham Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

IT'S A BATTLEFIELD by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1962

"And while appreciably less popular in character than much that he has written, Greene's more serious readership will welcome its reappearance and find it a subtle, serious commentary."
This early (1934) Graham Greene novel is being republished here for the first time, along with a new introduction in which Greene states that this fifth book was the least read of any of his novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MINISTRY OF FEAR by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1943

"Ingenious intrigue, handled with fastidious finish."
Less bizarre than Brighton Rock or Thy Labyrinthine Ways, this is a return to the straight mystery novel which in Greene's hands is always something more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE BY GRAHAM GREENE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 1952

"The Ministry of Fear."
Three "entertainments" as Graham Greene defines his earlier thrillers, will introduce a new Greene to many who have "discovered" him with his serious psychological novels and his critical writing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1961

"Its small cast, and general sophistication of theme and tone, would suggest that it will be desirable for little theatre groups and while no more than it is an agreeable diversion."
The book publication of this Greene play, a sophisticated marital and extramarital comedy which was hugely successful in London (partly due to the excellence of its cast), will be timed here to coincide with its Broadway production. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANOTHER MEXICO by Graham Greene
Released: June 5, 1939

"Particular market — the Catholics who want food for their wrath."
A Catholic tours Mexico and finds little to his liking, and plenty to condemn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S A BATTLEFIELD by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 21, 1934

"London today, with cuts from various social strata."
Not a mystery story, but will appeal to those mystery fans who liked BEFORE THE FACT, and THE PARADINE CASE, though there is less of continuity of thought and plot, and more of the flashlight treatment of his earlier book, ORIENT EXPRESS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE QUIET AMERICAN by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 1956

"It should assure a wider audience than Robert Shaplen's A Forest of Tigers (Knopf) which deals with this theme and this part of the world."
........ is a disquieting examination of a central, contemporary issue, and substitutes political conscience for the spiritual concern of Greene's recent vela but the battleground is still a highly personal terrain- and an individual is the chief casualty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREENE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 19, 1969

"It concludes with the sad apostrophe, 'How could they tell that for a writer as much as for a priest there is no such thing as success?"
Half of the essays here, including his more important sequence on Henry James, have been reprinted from Mr. Greene's 1952 collection The Lost Childhood which established in Greene's case that the creative writer could also be a critic of some distinction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUR MAN IN HAVANA by Graham Greene
Released: Oct. 24, 1958

"This still may be good enough for a great many people to whom the name assumes more than is this time assured."
Graham Greene's new "Entertainment" offers only a questionable diversion this time, substitutes a lightminded travesty of secret service operations (the intentions are not too clearly decipherable) for the surer suspense of the earlier books in this genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THIRD MAN by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1950

"The case here, the use of occasional characterization, the unrelieved and undeviating tension demonstrate again a mastery of this medium."
The story for the motion picture which has had a sensationally successful critical and popular reception, this although it may not be as "finished" (the author) as the film for which it was written, is still a highly effective experience in suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONSIGNOR QUIXOTE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 27, 1982

The theological shade of Greene—in a wispy, undramatic, but charming modern-day fable, loosely paralleling the Cervantes classic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1980

"So: not the memoir some might hope for—even less a sort of life than A Sort of Life (1971)—but, on its own terms, sufficiently alluring."
In no sense an autobiography—"Those parts of a life most beloved of columnists remain outside the scope of this book"—this is a suavely arranged, roughly chronological group of personal essays, most of them previously published: the introductions to the British collected edition of Greene's oeuvre; reportage from international trouble spots (Greene has sought peril as one "way of escape" from a vaguely defined angst); salutes to two or three friends; plus a few anecdotes and reflections. Read full book review >