Search Results: "Graziano Vitale"


BOOK REVIEW

SIMONE AND THE NIGHT'S MONSTERS by Graziano Vitale
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 4, 2011

"Well-worn premise, appealingly illustrated—but a nonstarter as an app. (iPad storybook app. 5-7)"
A miserly set of badly designed interactive effects sinks this tale of an intrepid lad doing nightly battle with a green monster, a giant spider and other bedtime foes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An accessible, thoughtful biblical study that unfortunately lacks rigor and direction."
An introduction to the history behind the creation of the Bible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE END OF POLICING by Alex  Vitale
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"A clearly argued, sure-to-be-controversial book."
Why better training of police officers is inadequate to reduce strained relations between law enforcement and minority or impoverished communities and why it is necessary to completely rethink the role of police in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PUSHKIN'S BUTTON by Serena Vitale
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"With its unabashed love of intrigue and nuance, Vitale's unusual chronicle of Pushkin's final days will appeal to any lover of Russian literature, history, and culture."
An Italian scholar's unorthodox take on the events leading to Pushkin's fatal duel reads like impassioned fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 4, 2011

"A superb pictorial and video meditation on the life of cities."
A great city is a tiny organism writ large, according to Vitale's debut multimedia e-book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHARM BRACELET by Emily Rodda
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"The series has been running overseas for several years, and to judge from its opener, should have made the jump long ago. (final illustrations not seen) (Fiction. 7-9)"
Writing for a younger audience, the Aussie author of the "Rowan of Rin" series sends a human child to rescue a fairy land about to be overrun by, as one hysterical elf puts it, "trolls and—ogres and—goblins—and dragons—and—giants—and—monsters—and—and—." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN THE WIND STOPS by Charlotte Zolotow
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 30, 1995

"A fine, seamless new match of text and art. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A shortened, reillustrated version of a classic picture book (originally illustrated by Howard Knotts, 1975): A child asks "Why does the day have to end?" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLEEPY BOOK by Charlotte Zolotow
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Better than a hot toddy, or even a cup of chamomile tea. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Bringing down eyelids for more than 40 years, Zolotow's sleepytime classic is decked out in its third set of illustrations for this reissue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF EASTER by Aileen Fisher
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 1997

"Every element of design makes this an inviting addition to the holiday shelf, even for those already owning the original book with Ati Forberg's illustrations. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
First published in 1968 and newly illustrated by Vitale, this is a history of the Christian celebration of Easter that, after briefly recounting the story of the Resurrection, links the holiday to other spring festivals, covers the ancient custom of giving the gift of an egg (a symbol of the new life of spring), and includes contemporary customs, such as the fashionable stroll down New York City's Fifth Avenue after church on that day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD IN 1492 by Jean Fritz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 12, 1992

"But, still, there's a great deal to ponder in this attractive overview—which may be most valuable for such unexpected depictions as the Aztecs supplanting a previous civilization, or the Maori hunting a species to extinction. (Nonfiction. 11-14)"
An ambitious undertaking: a survey with contributions by six eminent authors, plus fine reproductions of artifacts, photos of architecture, and contemporary maps. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 1980

"Accompanying the pretty, fuzzy sentiment are pretty, fuzzy pictures."