Search Results: "Greg Egan"


BOOK REVIEW

SCHILD’S LADDER by Greg Egan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2001

"No writer takes ideas as far or presents them so convincingly, from a spellbinding dramatization of a physical and ethical clash in a society that knows little of either up to an utterly brain-blasting exploration-explication of physics-as-biology."
Another mind-boggling vision from the author of the demanding but immensely rewarding Diaspora (1998). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIASPORA by Greg Egan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Vast in scope, episodic, complex, and utterly compelling: a hard science-fiction yarn that's worth every erg of the considerable effort necessary to follow."
This mind-boggling far-future yarn should help awaken America to the formidable talents of Australia resident Egan (Distress, p. 596). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DISTRESS by Greg Egan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1997

"Challenging, well informed, and iconoclastic, but also abstruse and often heavy: admirable rather than enjoyable, but an impressive first hardcover nonetheless."
About 60 years from now, SeeNet journalist and narrator Andrew Worth (he has a camera and computer software hardwired into his body) muscles in on a colleague's assignment to cover a physics convention on the artificial coral island, Stateless, at which Nobel laureate Violet Mosala is expected to announce a watertight Theory of Everything (TOE). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DICHRONAUTS by Greg Egan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 11, 2017

"Hard to imagine much of an audience outside math brainiacs and Egan enthusiasts."
Egan (The Arrows of Time, 2014, etc.) specializes in inventing seriously strange worlds; this one might well be his weirdest yet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 14, 1995

"A portrait of one man staring into America's societal abyss shouldn't be this superficial."
A well-meaning but ultimately unsatisfying account of a priest's work with youths in the barrio of East LA. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROASTED PEANUTS by Tim Egan
by Tim Egan, illustrated by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: April 3, 2006

"Dead-pan humor with a pitch-perfect aim. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sam and Jackson love to sit and watch baseball at Grant's Field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRIAL OF CARDIGAN JONES by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Not Egan at his best, though this may have some potential as a discussion starter on the idea of 'innocent until proven guilty.' (Picture book. 6-8)"
Only hints of the deadpan humor that made Egan's Serious Farm (2003) and other tales so droll come through here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRIDAY NIGHT AT HODGES' CAFE by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"One of the most exceptional and offbeat stories in some time. (Picture book. 4-8)"
It's Friday Night at Hodges' Cafe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNT TOAST ON DAVENPORT STREET by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Home is where the burnt toast is in this original and zany offering. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Stella and Arthur, a couple of dogs, live on Davenport Street. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHESTNUT COVE by Tim Egan
by Tim Egan, illustrated by Tim Egan
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1995

"As with his earlier work, Egan demonstrates why he is a rare bird: thoughtful, disarming, charming, and eccentric. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another splendid tale from Egan (Friday Night at Hodges' Cafe, 1994), cautionary but with the accent squarely on the story line. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DODSWORTH IN TOKYO by Tim Egan
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 16, 2013

"The poetics of restraint could not be better displayed. (Early reader. 6-9)"
Timing is everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 3, 2016

"An occasionally humorous, definitely informative look at what Americans eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and all those snack times in between and how our eating habits are changing who we are."
How American food habits have changed over time. Read full book review >