Search Results: "Gregg Herken"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GEORGETOWN SET by Gregg Herken
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 31, 2014

"An intricate study of the personalities that shaped U.S. Cold War policy."
Herken (Emeritus, Modern American Diplomatic History/Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, Brotherhood of the Bomb: The Tangled Lives and Loyalties of Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest Lawrence and Edward Teller, 2002, etc.) takes a rather clever idea promising titillating gossip among neighbors Joseph Alsop, Phil Graham and John F. Kennedy during the 1950s and '60s and amplifies it into a spiraling delineation of the official American response to the perceived Soviet threat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1992

"Herken's clear, well-documented writing and his close attention to the human element make for a fascinating and wisely cautionary study."
Engrossing and enlightening account of the checkered relationship between the scientific community and federal government from the Manhattan Project to SDI, by Herken (The Winning Weapon, 1980). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 9, 2002

"Thoughtful and important."
The dramatic story of physicists who put science at the service of the state, with momentous results for themselves and the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REVOLUTION 19 by Gregg Rosenblum
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"Robot apocalypse done right—sequels can't come fast enough. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
In 2051, the robot soldiers stopped fighting; the next day they took over the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST CHANCE by Gregg Hurwitz
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 17, 2017

"Predictable and plot-driven. (Post-apocalyptic adventure. 12-18)"
After an alien invasion, the survival of humanity depends on teenage brothers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HERE AND NOW by Gregg Easterbrook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 11, 2002

"Sort of a men's weeper, but funny, sexy, and thoughtful."
Easterbrook turns to the novel again (This Magic Moment, not reviewed) after some serious nonfiction (Beside Still Waters, 1998, etc.) and does quite well: involuntary time-travel to his better past self nearly queers a very big deal for a hotshot lawyer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUST NO ONE by Gregg Hurwitz
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 9, 2009

"In a briskly paced case that blends action with insight, Hurwitz puts the clues on the table, then plays the shell game with the reader and wins."
The stepson of a slain Secret Service agent sprints through a seven-day quest to solve a 17-year-old case. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Sea City by Gregg Nolan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 2015

"An apt beach read about Aquatics, even if the slam-bang heroics go over the top."
As global warming threatens Earth, human scientists encounter an incredible race of sea people who offer help in reversing environmental disaster—but an equally ancient enemy also resurfaces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORPHAN X by Gregg Hurwitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"With his digital-age The Avenger, Hurwitz races by minor plot holes and spins a web of relentless intrigue with bursts of tensely sketched violence."
Kicking off a new series, Hurwitz (Don't Look Back, 2014, etc.) sets young Evan Smoak, a one-time government assassin, to work as a pro bono equalizer—one call brings a criminal to justice.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CANNIBAL LAKE by Andy Gregg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"For all the corpses and ghosts, Gregg's first serves up cardboard characters in an underplotted broth that's terminally bland."
A thin debut about a cannibalistic spirit chewing 'em up and spitting 'em out in Wisconsin's North Woods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2012

"A well-researched, generally disinterested account whose parallels to today are obvious."
A journalist provides a balanced look at America's bloody effort to annex the Philippines in the early 20th century. Read full book review >