Search Results: "Gregg Spiridellis"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LONGEST CHRISTMAS LIST EVER by Gregg Spiridellis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Trevor truly seems to have worked through his year of greed and learned a valuable lesson about celebrating Christmas in a meaningful way. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When an imaginative little boy named Trevor opens his gifts on Christmas morning, he decides that he really should have asked for a puppy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REVOLUTION 19 by Gregg Rosenblum
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"Robot apocalypse done right—sequels can't come fast enough. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
In 2051, the robot soldiers stopped fighting; the next day they took over the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CANNIBAL LAKE by Andy Gregg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"For all the corpses and ghosts, Gregg's first serves up cardboard characters in an underplotted broth that's terminally bland."
A thin debut about a cannibalistic spirit chewing 'em up and spitting 'em out in Wisconsin's North Woods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HERE AND NOW by Gregg Easterbrook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 11, 2002

"Sort of a men's weeper, but funny, sexy, and thoughtful."
Easterbrook turns to the novel again (This Magic Moment, not reviewed) after some serious nonfiction (Beside Still Waters, 1998, etc.) and does quite well: involuntary time-travel to his better past self nearly queers a very big deal for a hotshot lawyer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Sea City by Gregg Nolan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 2015

"An apt beach read about Aquatics, even if the slam-bang heroics go over the top."
As global warming threatens Earth, human scientists encounter an incredible race of sea people who offer help in reversing environmental disaster—but an equally ancient enemy also resurfaces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUST NO ONE by Gregg Hurwitz
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 9, 2009

"In a briskly paced case that blends action with insight, Hurwitz puts the clues on the table, then plays the shell game with the reader and wins."
The stepson of a slain Secret Service agent sprints through a seven-day quest to solve a 17-year-old case. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORPHAN X by Gregg Hurwitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"With his digital-age The Avenger, Hurwitz races by minor plot holes and spins a web of relentless intrigue with bursts of tensely sketched violence."
Kicking off a new series, Hurwitz (Don't Look Back, 2014, etc.) sets young Evan Smoak, a one-time government assassin, to work as a pro bono equalizer—one call brings a criminal to justice.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2012

"A well-researched, generally disinterested account whose parallels to today are obvious."
A journalist provides a balanced look at America's bloody effort to annex the Philippines in the early 20th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIDNIGHT PLAGUE by Gregg Keizer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 18, 2005

"A simplistic plot delivered with race-against-the-clock urgency."
Heroic American doctor and plucky French gamine team up to neutralize a Nazi threat in Keizer's follow-up to The Longest Night (2004). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KING OF SPORTS by Gregg Easterbrook
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"Trenchant analysis, wrenching case studies, Utopian recommendations."
Head-slaps and high-fives for the sport that dominates America's popular imagination by Atlantic Monthly contributor and ESPN.com "Tuesday Morning Quarterback" writer Easterbrook (The Leading Indicators, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Easterbrook's sensible, infectious glad tidings are a balm to our environmental concerns, but he needs more editorial red ink, and he needs to remember that all movements must shower some sparks if they hope to start a prairie fire and fan it to keep it going."
Nature is not the wimp that environmentalists would have us suppose, and hysterics regarding the state of the planet will only undercut the advances made over the last 25 years, claims Easterbrook in a voluminous study marred by contradictory moments and petty jibes. Read full book review >