Search Results: "Guillermo Cabrera Infante"


BOOK REVIEW

GUILTY OF DANCING THE CHACHACHÁ by Guillermo Cabrera Infante
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"Cabrera Infante's ebullient literary gamesmanship travels very well indeed."
A witty gathering of three ingeniously interrelated short stories, first published in 1995, by the Cuban-born postmodernist prankster (and recent winner of Spain's prestigious Cervantes Prize) whose agreeably odd fiction includes Three Trapped Tigers (1971) and Infante's Inferno (1984). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEA CUBA by Guillermo Cabrera Infante
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Would it be too much to ask of this brilliant exile that he provide the kind of profound account of Castro's Cuba that only he could give—and that he restrain his punning?"
While singularly informative, this volume of autobiographically oriented sketches of recent Cuban history and culture is, in the end, evasive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLY SMOKE by Guillermo Cabrera Infante
NON-FICTION
Released: June 12, 1997

"Take a leaf from this book and have some robusto fun."
An engaging classic about a ``burning passion''—cigar smoking—is available here more than a decade after its original UK issue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAP DRAWN BY A SPY by Guillermo Cabrera Infante
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 29, 2017

"An exile's plainspoken testimonial, bookending Orwell's Homage to Catalonia in the literature of political disappointment."
A geography of disillusionment as limned by the noted Cuban writer (Guilty of Dancing the Chachachá, 2001, etc.), once a stalwart of the Fidelista revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVING PEDRO INFANTE by Denise Chávez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 2001

"Not much story here, but the vivid characterizations and highly sensual style more than make up for it. Chavez's heroine is passionate, foolish, and wonderfully human."
Funny, raunchy novel from the author of American Book Award-winner Face of an Angel (1994), this is about lonely women in a dusty bordertown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 15, 2001

"Ably explored and told, The Prisoners of Cabrera will be of considerable interest to students of the Napoleonic era and of issues of military justice."
Able were they ere they saw Cabrera: a fascinating exploration of an all-but-forgotten footnote in French history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONELY CROSSING OF JUAN CABRERA by J. Joaquín Fraxedas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 25, 1993

Juan Cabrera, a Cuban born of landowners but too late to emigrate in the first great wave to Miami, finally has his opportunity to become a bolsero, a rafter, making escape from Castro's brutal failure by crossing the straits to Florida and freedom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROCK-A-BYE BABY by Jane Cabrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Ho-hum. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A riff on the familiar lullaby depicts various animal parents, and then a human father, soothing their sleepy little ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP by Jane Cabrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Another winner from Cabrera. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Who knew that one little girl with her basket of knitting needles could so tax the wool production of a generous black sheep? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IF YOU’RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT! by Jane Cabrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"Guaranteed to get preschoolers (and maybe their sleepy caregivers) moving. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A menagerie of jungle critters engage in some foot-stomping, hand-clapping, rip-roaring sing-along fun that just begs for audience participation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLD MACDONALD HAD A FARM by Jane Cabrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2008

"Nothing particularly original here, but a bright enticement to the very young to sing along, and learn about the farm animals. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Eye-catching illustrations enliven a children's musical classic. Read full book review >