Search Results: "Guy Vasilovich"


BOOK REVIEW

ECHOES OF A DISTANT SUMMER by Guy Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 27, 2002

"There is good and there is evil. Jackson Tremain will identify one from the other, and right the wrong, stirring an expectant reader's heartbeat along the way."
A carefully plotted mob thriller that will leave its readers faintly exhilarated, though also unable to remember who exactly was good and bad—yet not particularly disappointed by that fact. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 21, 1995

"Somewhere within this clutter of melodramatic action and attitude there lurks an interesting heroine with an interesting story to tell, but, sadly, she's not easy to find."
An angry, once-abused woman painter almost disintegrates, then experiences a last-minute healing in an equally abused placemid- 70s Haiti: the emotional, scattershot newest from Trinidadian-born Guy (My Love, My Love, or the Peasant Girl, 1985, etc.) Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A proper diagnosis, likely some good medicine, delivered with an unfortunate bedside manner."
With the entire European project severely threatened, Belgium's former prime minister offers a prescription to save the European Union. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELIZABETH by John Guy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"One of the best biographies of Elizabeth ever."
The Whitbread Award-winning author delivers an outstanding biography of Queen Elizabeth (1533-1603). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 6, 2012

"Impressive research underlies a well-told story that's simultaneously depressing (what a nasty species we are) and inspiring (what a wonderful species we are)."
Partisan bickering, back-stabbing rivalries, xenophobia, character assassination, political moves that would make Machiavelli blush—no, not Washington circa 2011, but the Washington Capitol in the 1850s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRAITOR by Guy Walters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2005

"Lack of imagination dooms a potentially fascinating subject, in a disappointing first from British journalist Walters."
Debut thriller, mining the history of the British Free Corps, a regiment of English soldiers that fought for Hitler, stars a British secret agent who turns traitor to save his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST CROSSING by Guy Vanderhaeghe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Sumptuously imagined and fashioned with a master craftsman's attentiveness and finesse. Brilliant work."
An ambitious sixth outing from the Saskatchewan author who has twice won Canada's Governor General's Award (for Man Descending, 1985, and The Englishman's Boy, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOPHIE by Guy Burt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2003

"Slight and obliquely told, but dense with atmospherics and creeping dread."
From the British author of The Hole (2001): a first US appearance of a slim, taut, creepy psychological thriller, written when Burt was 19. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIX DAY WAR by Guy Laron
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Primarily of scholarly interest, though readers with an interest in Middle Eastern geopolitics will find much of value."
A penetrating study of a conflict that, although brief, helped establish a Middle Eastern template that is operational today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOLE by Guy Burt
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Bleak but not horrifying. (Bram Stoker can rest easy.) Will probably be clutched to the bosoms of professionally moody young people whose parents could never understand."
Following the spooky plan of a charismatic classmate, five British schoolmates entomb themselves; when the promised third-day release fails to materialize, they . . . complain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A lively, balanced re-examination of the traditional mind-body issue in light of modern advances in neuroscience."
"We do not have bodies, we are bodies," writes Claxton (Emeritus, Learning Sciences/Univ. of Winchester; The Wayward Mind: An Intimate History of the Unconscious, 2005, etc.) in this challenge to the contemporary view of what it means to be intelligent. Read full book review >