Search Results: "Gwendolyn Heasley"


BOOK REVIEW

WHERE I BELONG by Gwendolyn Heasley
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 8, 2011

"Patience really is required: Rich girl Corrinne is truly obnoxious, but her attitude is amusing, and her evolution, although much too facile, is at least entertaining. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Sixteen-year-old Corrinne begins her self-focused narrative with a plea—"If you hate me at first, keep reading." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON'T CALL ME BABY by Gwendolyn Heasley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 22, 2014

"This surprisingly poignant comedy about teen-parent communication has enough bite to pique the interest of any teenager having trouble interacting meaningfully with her parents. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Usually it's a kid's use of social media that is a problem…. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 19, 2012

"A compelling travel and sports narrative occasionally marred by a lack of focus."
A former star college soccer player travels the world to find and film pickup games for a documentary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WELFARE'S END by Gwendolyn Mink
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1998

"Something to think about as the time limits on welfare support start kicking in."
At last—a serious counterthrust against the popular self-interested praise for welfare reform. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2005

"Faithful attempt. Still, it could be that you had to be there."
Forced to relocate from downtown Manhattan after 9/11, a career woman discovers warmth, camaraderie and more in a small-town barroom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FORTUNE TELLER by Gwendolyn Womack
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 2017

"A well-worn template with entertaining embellishments."
An ancient manuscript seems to predict the future—including the dangerous journey set in motion by the woman who discovers it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Meditation Moments by Victor Stobbe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2015

"A worthy contribution to the afterlife of biblical poetry."
Debut author Stobbe gives modern readers a fresh look at the Psalms in this clever poetic experiment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OFF TO SCHOOL by Gwendolyn Battle-Lavert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

From the author of The Barber's Cutting Edge (1994), a flawed story that is also predictable: Wezielee, the youngest child of a large African-American sharecropper family, is left at home to cook the midday meal while the rest of her family toils in the fields. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I KICK THE BALL / PATEO EL BALÓN by Gwendolyn Zepeda
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 31, 2011

"A good bet for young soccer fans. (Picture book. 4-8)"
With an underlying message of good nutrition and daily exercise, Zepeda introduces a young boy struggling to balance school and chores with his dreams of future soccer stardom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRONZEVILLE BOYS AND GIRLS by Gwendolyn Brooks
POETRY
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"There is a drop of truth in every single playful, piercing stanza, and anything that brings these poems to a new audience is to be cheered; a lovely package indeed. (Picture book/poetry. 7+)"
Brooks's gloriously universal celebration of African-American childhood here receives a respectful and joyous treatment from one of the pre-eminent illustrators of the same. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TINY STITCHES by Gwendolyn Hooks
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 15, 2016

"A good alternative to dense chapter biographies and a rousing tribute to a man unjustly forgotten. (notes, glossary, references) (Picture book. 7-12)"
Hooks (The Noisy Night, 2014, etc.) and Bootman (Hey, Charleston!, 2013, etc.) illuminate the trials and triumphs of Vivien Thomas and his vital role in the development of children's open-heart surgery.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 22, 1997

"A striking memoir of a gifted black woman's lonely, difficult, and unsatisfying climb to the heights of American power and prestige."
Parker candidly addresses issues of race, gender and the true meaning of privilege for herself and for society at large. Read full book review >