Search Results: "Gyles Brandreth"


BOOK REVIEW

OSCAR WILDE AND THE VAMPIRE MURDERS by Gyles Brandreth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 3, 2011

"A witty, if wildly implausible jaunt into the boys' clubs of a different age."
The fourth entry in an over-the-top Victorian mystery series, starring the ever-so-rakish Oscar Wilde. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OSCAR WILDE AND A DEATH OF NO IMPORTANCE by Gyles Brandreth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"Brandreth (Philip and Elizabeth, 2005, etc.) captures Wilde's frothy joie de vivre and develops this first installment of a proposed trilogy with color and aplomb."
When the police drag their heels investigating the murder of a beautiful boy of the streets, his friend Oscar Wilde is compelled to solve the crime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"The lengthy wink-and-nudge footnotes are more rewarding than the wishy-washy main narrative."
Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth, speaks—guardedly—in this gossipy, sympathetic account of marital shenanigans by a British broadcaster and self-confessed insider. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OSCAR WILDE AND A GAME CALLED MURDER by Gyles Brandreth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2008

"A delicious bagatelle, frothier and more imaginative than its predecessor."
Life fatally imitates a Wildean divertissement. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OSCAR WILDE AND THE DEAD MAN’S SMILE by Gyles Brandreth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Episodic and irrepressibly droll, Wilde's third case benefits from a full-bodied cast of supporting characters and a looser narrative flow."
The inimitable Oscar triumphantly tours America and Europe, meeting a pantheon of stars and solving a murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OSCAR WILDE AND THE VATICAN MURDERS by Gyles Brandreth
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 8, 2012

"Brandreth's fifth Oscar Wilde caper (Oscar Wilde and the Vampire Murders, 2011, etc.) floats on a cushion of bubbly banter and droll period references. The whole series is literary escapism of a high order, though with each episode the mystery seems to recede further in importance."
When someone sends the creator of a legendary sleuth a severed hand, the game is afoot! Read full book review >