Search Results: "H. Joseph Hopkins"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TREE LADY by H. Joseph Hopkins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 17, 2013

"An appealing treatment of an accomplished woman's life. (author's note) (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
Hopkins respectfully profiles Kate Sessions, a pioneering horticulturalist who helped transform San Diego's City Park from a barren waste into today's lush, tree-filled Balboa Park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Bughouse by Joseph H. Baskin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 25, 2016

"A slow immersion into chaos that's torture for the protagonist but sheer enjoyment for readers."
In Baskin's debut thriller, a prison psychiatrist becomes a patsy for a white supremacist gang leader looking for a way out of jail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1995

"A masterful report on a turning-point encounter in the context of a global conflict. (42 photos, 19 maps) (Military Book Club main selection)"
A harrowingly effective overview of the 76-hour clash that pitted US naval forces against entrenched Japanese defenders in the blood-drenched battle for a tiny Central Pacific atoll known as Tarawa (capital of the Gilbert Islands) during WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 14, 1993

"Those seeking up-to-date guidance on the lessons to be learned from IBM should turn to Paul Carroll's estimable Big Blues (reviewed below)."
In light of last month's announcement that IBM was taking an $8.9-billion charge against second-quarter earnings and eliminating another 85,000 jobs, the incredibly upbeat subtitle of this parochial case study appears to have been overtaken by events—and is simply misleading. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

JOSEPH KANON
by Clayton Moore

In an age when America’s intelligence services aren’t always portrayed in the best light, Joseph Kanon’s new novel about the Cold War seems starkly elegant by comparison. In our starred review, Kirkus says of Defectors, “...not since Le Carré’s A Perfect Spy has there been a family of spooks to rival this one.”

The novel is an intimate ...


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BLOG POST

JOSEPH SCAPELLATO
by Richard Z. Santos

Joseph Scapellato isn’t from the west—he grew up in suburban Chicago—but like so many Americans, the mythic west was always nearby.  “My mom was and is an enormous fan of golden age Westerns: Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, all those dudes in white hats,” Scapellato says. “I grew up watching those, and she accumulated all these cowboy tchotchkes. I grew ...


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BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 29, 1990

An uneven but provocative appreciation of the socioeconomic forces that promise to produce convulsive change in the US workplace by the turn of the century and beyond. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRESS MAKES YOU FAT, WRINKLED AND DEAD by Eliezer  Ben-Joseph
Released: July 27, 2017

"Some useful health advice can be found amid the plethora of suggestions."
A debut book pinpoints the myriad sources of stress in modern life and offers tips for coping with it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 11, 2017

"An intelligent, rigorous analysis of a political mystery."
An insider's account of a neglected but significant moment in American presidential history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRESS START TO PLAY by Daniel H. Wilson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A mixed bag, like many anthologies, but sci-fi fans will find it well worth their while."
An anthology that examines the relationship between video games and storytelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBOT UPRISINGS by Daniel H. Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 2014

"Philip K. Dick would be proud, in any event. You'll never look at your Roomba the same way again."
Fun fact: According to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, as of 2010 there were 8.6 million robots in the world. Fun scenario: They're all out to kill us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 1980

"Not for serious sf folk, and no substantial nutrition for anybody—but a serviceable enough bedside anthology for those who get a yen for just a taste of something silly or tricky before going to sleep."
One hundred miniature sf short stories, most of them too gimmicky to induce more than a shrug—but a few old pros do provide some mini-pleasure. Read full book review >