Search Results: "H.B. Lewis"


BOOK REVIEW

WINNIE MAE by H.B. Lewis
by H.B. Lewis, illustrated by H.B. Lewis
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The book may captivate older boys with dreams of flying, if they can be book-talked past the picture-book format. (Picture book. 8-11)"
A beautiful but over-designed book—it has a small, thin typeface that is difficult to read—about a boy and his model planes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEWIS by A. Barsell Carlyle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 23, 2009

"An enjoyable beach read for men, but suspense lags until the final pages."
A debut novel of men's fiction/suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY PENGUIN OSBERT by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Salutary reading for all children campaigning for a pet. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Thanks to an unseen but unusually obliging Santa, this cautionary tale of a lad discovering the hazards of even carefully phrased wishes reaches a happy resolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

C.S. LEWIS by Michael White
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A readable, balanced portrait of a great humanist."
Prolific English biographer White (Leonardo, 2000, etc.) delineates in lively fashion the less than saintly life of the Christian apologist, children's author, Luddite, and fuddy-duddy Oxford don. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN I HAVE A STEGOSAURUS, MOM? CAN I? PLEASE!? by Lois G. Grambling
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"The illustrations, sometimes haunting and sometimes baffling, are soft-edged; they are full of dramatic angles and lighting effects. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The pleading voice of the title belongs to an impish boy, baseball cap worn backwards, who negotiates fiercely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEWIS & CLARK by Nick Bertozzi
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Slated to be the first in a series on explorers, this expedition ends with high hopes for subsequent volumes. (selected bibliography) (Graphic historical fiction. 12 & up)"
With masterful command, Bertozzi offers an innovative take on Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's epic journey in this oversized graphic offering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY PENGUIN OSBERT IN LOVE by Elizabeth Cody Kimmel
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 13, 2009

"Kimmel and Lewis employ the same combination of understated text against sweetly ironic watercolor-and-pastel illustrations, but even though this story goes all the way to Antarctica and back, it hasn't the emotional or humorous legs of its predecessor—a shame. (Picture book. 6-9)"
The child-and-penguin duo introduced in the fresh and funny My Penguin Osbert (2004) returns for a pallid new adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Bibliography; index. (Biography. 12+)"
Latimer, a self-taught draftsman, drew up Bell's patent application for the telephone (delivered to the Patent Office only hours before a rival claim) and went on to frame many of Edison's patents, help him improve the light bulb, and supervise the installation of electrical systems in several cities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 8, 1997

"A charming if terse summary of the journey; readers wanting a detailed history should look elsewhere. (First printing of 100,000; Literary Guild main selection)"
Duncan's second book on the Lewis and Clark expedition (Out West, 1987) is the companion volume to the newest documentary by Burns, scheduled to air on public television stations in early November. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 12, 1995

"Cohen sees Dodgson finally as a talented, upright, melancholy figure, but does not fully integrate Carroll into this protean man. (135 illustrations, not seen)"
Cohen, the editor of Carroll's herculean correspondence, succeeds with the man's Victorian character—both the academic and the eccentric elements—but misses the point of Carroll's pointless nonsense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEWIS MAN by Peter May
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Despite some well-judged surprises, the mystery isn't all that mysterious. But you'll keep turning the pages anyway—not to learn whodunit, but to find out what's going to happen to the present-day characters so deeply, fatally rooted in the past."
The second installment in May's Lewis trilogy finds Fin Macleod (The Blackhouse, 2011) without a job or wife but with another brooding case set on the outermost island of the Outer Hebrides.Read full book review >