Search Results: "H.L. Mencken"


BOOK REVIEW

THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE by H.L. Mencken
Released: June 27, 1936

"Words, phrases, pronunciation, usage, sheer barbarisms and colloquialisms, dialects, sectional peculiarities, place and proper names, etc. etc. An essential item for public and college libraries, and for any private library that pretends to have well rounded reference shelves."
Do you recall that the suggestion was made (in reviewing Herbert's What A Word! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 22, 1939

"New Yorker readers will recognize parts of it."
Reminiscences of the author's boyhood in Baltimore that will delight more than the usual Mencken satellites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TREATISE ON RIGHT AND WRONG by H.L. Mencken
Released: April 2, 1934

"An extensive advertising and promotion campaign and a popular press are assured."
The Mencken market is not very large, but it is assured and this is a book all Mencken fans will want, a companion volume to his TREATISE ON THE GODS. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 21, 1956

"Somehow, Mencken read today fails to shock, to challenge, though he can still provide the quotable epigram."
Astringent commentator, this one time the Idol of the youth of the '20's, became — according to Barzun- the "Monumental Mencken" of the 40's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SECOND MENCKEN CHRESTOMATHY by H.L. Mencken
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 30, 1995

"Still, this has everything that puts Mencken alongside Ambrose Bierce and Edmund Wilson in the American tradition of intelligent ornery writing."
Rescued from an abandoned but essentially finished manuscript, the second of Mencken's chrestomathies forms as good a compendium of social and literary irascibility as one could hope for. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 27, 1945

"It is not a book for quick reference, but for thoughtful consultation and pickup reading."
This is apparently a complete revision, corrected, expanded, brought up to date (even to including the material used in the American Army pamphlet relating to word variations between England and this country). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 5, 1948

"Don't consider this as saleable only to those who have the earlier volume — but use as opening wedge to introduce Supplement One."
Supplement One amplified, revised, enriched the first 300 pages- roughly- of the original The American Language. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"And an excellent introduction for this generation to a man who loves life."
The culling of the best, the choicest passages, from the famous Prejudices, which in their day made Mencken leader of the iconoclasts, shocker of the conservatives, and favorite of the younger generation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 13, 1976

"Would that he were around to write up the '76 election."
The '48 presidential campaign was Mencken's last hurrah; soon he would suffer a massive stroke and dwindle into silence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1975

"Great fun all the way, and first-rate American prose crisp as a new dollar bill."
Theo Lippman, Jr. supplies a sizable sketch of Mencken to go with this selection of the great curmudgeon's nasty comments on newspaper publishers, editors and reporters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIARY OF H.L. MENCKEN by H.L. Mencken
Released: Jan. 15, 1989

"Hardly the American Samuel Johnson (as Fecher avers), Mencken isn't even equal to Edmund Wilson, whose own diaries contribute to literary history in a way Mencken's seldom do."
Sealed for 25 years since his death in 1956, the diaries of the once popular critic and newspaperman only now have been edited from the original manuscript, which is three times longer than the selections brought together here by Mencken scholar Fecher. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CHOICE OF DAYS by H.L. Mencken
Released: Sept. 12, 1980

"There is entertainment to spare in Mencken, and lots of snazzy writing."
Memories of infancy, early schooling, Baltimore provender, "The Larval Stage of a Bookworm," and other autobiographical essays culled from Happy Days (1940), Newspaper Days (1941), and Heathen Days (1943) and splendidly—which is to say buoyantly—introduced by Edward L. Galligan. Read full book review >