Search Results: "Hanna Johansen"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DUCK AND THE OWL by Hanna Johansen
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 30, 2005

"There's a resolution of sorts—'See you again soon,' says the owl, dozing into his much-needed day's sleep—but one doesn't hold out much hope for the relationship. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Two birds residing in the same meadow take a rather neurotic stab at friendship in this Swiss import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENRIETTA AND THE GOLDEN EGGS by Hanna Johansen
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Better for one-on-one reading to give the pictures (and chickens) their due. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Henrietta is one of 3,333 chickens crowded together in a chicken house on a chicken farm in a space with just enough room for their feet; she is the only little one and the only one without a cough or loss of feathers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A TOMCAT'S TALE by Hanna Johansen
by Hanna Johansen, translated by Susanna Fox, illustrated by Käthi Bhend
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1991

"Cat-lovers' heaven; a perfect family readaloud. (Fiction. 6+)"
From the point of view of a cat who'd be pampered if he allowed it, an incisive look at what being a cat is like: communicating with obtuse humans; establishing territory; contriving to get out, and in; philosophically hunkering down in a new neighborhood while temporarily lost; catching mice; getting hauled off to the vet (once, after the AWOL incident, for the purpose of being neutered); making a tentative friendship with another cat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WE SINNERS by Hanna Pylväinen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2012

"It's always a good thing when one wants more instead of less. A promising debut, and a glimpse at a hidden American subculture that few readers will suspect even exists."
Lovely, lyrical debut novel of a family in slowly unfolding crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Hiramic Brotherhood of the Third Temple by William Hanna
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 19, 2014

"A deeply political novel that tackles the long history of struggle in Israel."
A debut work that dramatizes the state of Israel and the plight of the Palestinians. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Chameleon by K.T. Hanna
Released: July 21, 2015

"A bracing debut that might just knock the wind out of readers."
This YA sci-fi novel explores a future in which authorities test psionically gifted teens for inclusion in a cutthroat, corporate-run society. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIPPIN TAKES A BATH by K.V. Johansen
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Lighthearted, lightweight, Johansen's story is well-paced and charming, while Lum's watercolors dance with simplicity, conveying the affection between Pippin and Mabel in a few expressive lines. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Pippin and Mabel, a dog and a girl, respectively, will endear themselves and be instantly recognizable to any child who has ever tried to get a dog into a bathtub. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FACE OF DECEPTION by Iris Johansen
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 12, 1998

"A sequel is on its way, and perhaps with that Johansen will deliver what she only promises here."
Johansen (And Then You Die, 1998, etc.) leaves romance behind for some pedestrian adventure and a stab at emotional healing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BODY OF LIES by Iris Johansen
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 26, 2002

"Elementary prose studded with innumerable clichés. But the convoluted storyline of this, Johansen's sixtieth novel (Final Target, 2001, etc.), is sure to please faithful fans."
A forensic sculptor still searches for her murdered daughter's face in every skull she reconstructs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE END OF MEN by Hanna Rosin
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"A great starting point for readers interested in exploring the intersecting issues of gender, family and employment."
Atlantic senior editor Rosin (God's Harvard: A Christian College on a Mission to Save America, 2007), co-founder of Slate's women's section, DoubleX, argues that women are more likely than men to succeed in the modern workforce. Read full book review >