Search Results: "Harold Bloom"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 9, 1977

"Yet the book glows with insights into both literature and personality and is sure to stand as a megalith in Stevens' criticism."
Harold Bloom sees modern poetry as a battlefield where new poets fight against their predecessors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 21, 1975

"He's as radical as he is erudite, and has a great deal to teach us about poetics, the canon, and the art of reading."
This is the concluding volume to the tetralogy that Yale professor Harold Bloom initiated in The Anxiety of Influence, his 1973 manifesto for so-called "antithetical criticism." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1998

"Norman Jeffares Irish Love Poems speaks for itself, while Ken Smith's Beyond Bedlam needs a word of caution: these poems written 'out of mental distress' may be, at times, extra-literary, but they are always compelling."
The Academy of American Poets, who initiated the designating of April as poetry month, hoped above all for one thing: more readers of verse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 7, 1972

"Imposing, daemonic and — it seems so incidental — written with a mighty adversative flair."
Professor Bloom (Yale; author of Blake's Apocalypse, 1963, and Yeats, 1970) interprets modern poetic history — the history of poetry in a Cartesian climate — in terms of Freud's "family romance," and advances creative anxiety as its motive principle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 11, 1994

"An unashamed spur to contention, and all the better for it: an elegant and erudite provocation."
One of our biggest critical gun fires a characteristically Olympian broadside into the canon debate, no quarter spared for the politically correct. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE SHALL WISDOM BE FOUND? by Harold Bloom
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 7, 2004

"Another work of uncompromised literary analysis, thought, and feeling, from the mind of Bloom: towering, real, invaluable."
The latest from the venerable Bloom (Hamlet: Poem Unlimited, 2003, etc.) may not always be easy going, but it's invariably rewarding and rich. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAMLET: POEM UNLIMITED by Harold Bloom
Released: March 10, 2003

"Shakespeare criticism that's big, alive, towering, deep, passionate—in an age that so industriously miniaturizes and demeans its literature."
Bloom says that in Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), other matters kept him from saying "most of what [he] thought and felt" about Hamlet. A lucky thing, since now the great-hearted critic offers this little gem—deftly snatching Hamlet away from its legions of minor readers and reclaiming it for its major ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"As always, Bloom conveys the intimate, urgent, compelling sense of why it matters that we read these canonical authors."
Elegiac, gracious literary ponderings that group and compare 12 giants of American literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLEOPATRA by Harold Bloom
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"A masterfully perceptive reading of this seductive play's 'endless wonders.'"
A wise inquiry into an "erotic and yet transcendent" play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1988

"Perhaps Bloom's most accessible book, and probably his most endearing: a bounty of coy surprises and typical leaps of brilliance."
An unguarded, somewhat informal study of poetic struggle and human faith, by the unsinkably prolific Harvard dynast of modern literary criticism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: Oct. 6, 1961

"We suspect this will be more popular with teachers and assembly program planners than with the children for whom it was intended."
In this anthology of poetry arranged according to seasons of the year, "selections" usually found in collections for young people have been avoided in favor of less familiar works". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOMEN WRITERS OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE by Harold Bloom
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 1997

In the Women Writers of English and Their Works series, an entry that brings together 12 children's book (female) writers, most of them dead (Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Louise Fitzhugh, Kate Greenaway, E. Nesbit, L.M. Montgomery, Beatrix Potter, P.L. Travers, Laura Ingalls Wilder), but three who are most definitely not: Madeleine L'Engle, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Katherine Paterson. Read full book review >