Search Results: "Harold Bloom"


BOOK REVIEW

CLEOPATRA by Harold Bloom
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"A masterfully perceptive reading of this seductive play's 'endless wonders.'"
A wise inquiry into an "erotic and yet transcendent" play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: Oct. 6, 1961

"We suspect this will be more popular with teachers and assembly program planners than with the children for whom it was intended."
In this anthology of poetry arranged according to seasons of the year, "selections" usually found in collections for young people have been avoided in favor of less familiar works". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAMLET: POEM UNLIMITED by Harold Bloom
Released: March 10, 2003

"Shakespeare criticism that's big, alive, towering, deep, passionate—in an age that so industriously miniaturizes and demeans its literature."
Bloom says that in Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), other matters kept him from saying "most of what [he] thought and felt" about Hamlet. A lucky thing, since now the great-hearted critic offers this little gem—deftly snatching Hamlet away from its legions of minor readers and reclaiming it for its major ones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF J by David Rosenberg
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1990

A fresh and lively translation, with extensive, provocative, and, likely, inflammatory commentary by Bloom, of the Book of J—the seminal text of the first five books of the Bible; a text, most biblical scholars agree, written around 950 B.C. by an unknown genius. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1998

"Norman Jeffares Irish Love Poems speaks for itself, while Ken Smith's Beyond Bedlam needs a word of caution: these poems written 'out of mental distress' may be, at times, extra-literary, but they are always compelling."
The Academy of American Poets, who initiated the designating of April as poetry month, hoped above all for one thing: more readers of verse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 21, 1975

"He's as radical as he is erudite, and has a great deal to teach us about poetics, the canon, and the art of reading."
This is the concluding volume to the tetralogy that Yale professor Harold Bloom initiated in The Anxiety of Influence, his 1973 manifesto for so-called "antithetical criticism." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 7, 1972

"Imposing, daemonic and — it seems so incidental — written with a mighty adversative flair."
Professor Bloom (Yale; author of Blake's Apocalypse, 1963, and Yeats, 1970) interprets modern poetic history — the history of poetry in a Cartesian climate — in terms of Freud's "family romance," and advances creative anxiety as its motive principle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"As always, Bloom conveys the intimate, urgent, compelling sense of why it matters that we read these canonical authors."
Elegiac, gracious literary ponderings that group and compare 12 giants of American literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 9, 1977

"Yet the book glows with insights into both literature and personality and is sure to stand as a megalith in Stevens' criticism."
Harold Bloom sees modern poetry as a battlefield where new poets fight against their predecessors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1992

"Remarkable ideas remarkably set forth."
Bloom wanders a bit, away from Yale into "the Evening Land" of America and its churches—and reconstructs a remarkable diagram of the religious imagination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALSTAFF by Harold Bloom
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2017

"In this first of five books about Shakespearean personalities, Bloom brings erudition and boundless enthusiasm."
An ardent admirer of Shakespeare analyzes an incomparably robust character. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JESUS AND YAHWEH by Harold Bloom
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 6, 2005

"Bloom barely provides a gloss on more substantial work, such as the two volumes by Jack Miles (God: A Biography, 1995; Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God, 2001), which are often invoked in these pages."
A return to the Bible by the noted Yale professor and literary critic, though the slapdash results lack the depth of most of the volumes he cites. Read full book review >