Search Results: "Harold G. Moore"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 19, 2008

"A worthy and wise successor to one of the best books ever about combat in Vietnam."
To honor fallen comrades, a journalist and a soldier return to Vietnam battlefields more than 30 years later. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"An authoritative briefing whose band-of-brothers perspectives make it a genuinely affecting addition to the growing record of America's involvement in Vietnam. (Sixteen pages of photographs— not seen—and seven maps.)"
During mid-November 1965, Moore (then a lieutenant colonel) led 450 officers and men from the US Army's 1st Cavalry Division into the Ia Drang Valley, a trackless waste near Vietnam's border with Cambodia that served as a Communist sanctuary and infiltration route into Vietnam's Central Highlands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAYING BACK JACK by Christopher G. Moore
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 6, 2009

"Enough tangled plotlines for a miniseries. Moore clearly has no fear that his gloriously corrupt Bangkok will ever run dry."
Bangkok private eye Vincent Calvino's enforced vacation only plunges him deeper into Thailand's stew of violence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RISK OF INFIDELITY INDEX by Christopher G. Moore
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Tough, wisecracking Calvino is nothing special, but the darkly raffish Bangkok milieu is a treat."
A veteran Bangkok shamus, born and bred in New York, makes his American debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASIA HAND by Christopher G. Moore
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2010

"Less original and densely packed than Calvino's earlier cases (Paying Back Jack, 2009, etc.), but just as dankly atmospheric."
Once more Vincent Calvino, Bangkok's most newsworthy private eye, forgoes paying clients to avenge a dead acquaintance and incidentally protect himself and his family. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

DAVID BARCLAY MOORE
by Megan Labrise

Readers of all ages, get ready to catch a rising star. David Barclay Moore’s electric debut, The Stars Beneath Our Feet, is a middle-grade must-read as vibrant and variant as the thrumming thoroughfare where it unfolds: Harlem’s 125th Street.

“If Harlem was a human body, then 125th would be its pumping heart, throbbing all the time,” writes Moore, who ...


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BOOK REVIEW

VERGIL'S AENEID by Harold Bloom
POETRY
Released: Dec. 16, 1996

"The series, so far, goes from the Aeneid to Angelou; each volume is loaded with colorful educational tools and offers a ready source of structured information. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
This is the first entry in the Bloom's Notes series, part of the Contemporary Literary Views Books; Bloom (The Western Canon, 1994, etc.) introduces Vergil, then steps back as various writers and academic experts past and present provide analyses of theme, character, and literary worth, mostly through excerpts from previously published material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD IS THE HOME OF LOVE AND DEATH by Harold Brodkey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

statement page Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEVERMORE by Harold Schechter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Good atmosphere, dull story."
Davy Crockett meets Edgar Allan Poe—and together they set out in search of Baltimore's 1830s equivalent of John Wayne Gacy: a gothic thriller (and first hardcover fiction) from Schechter (Depraved: The Shocking Story of America's First Serial Killer, 1994, etc.) Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEA BATTLES ON DRY LAND by Harold Brodkey
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 15, 1999

"A test of Robertson Davies's plea that people's bad journalism should not be held against them."
Brodkey's self-involved, prolix prose style, which made his long-awaited Runaway Soul (1991) a sacred monster of recent fiction, fails badly to translate into readable essays on art, culture, politics, books, etc. After winning an early niche at the New Yorker with his fiction, Brodkey, like Updike and Barthelme, could always place an essay there—no matter how slight or puffed up the piece. Read full book review >