Search Results: "Harriet McBryde Johnson"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 8, 2005

"A remarkable portrait of a woman who is proof that the disabled can live lives filled with purpose and pleasure."
Selected episodes from the life of "a tiny wheelchair woman with a certain amount of mouth," as disability rights activist Johnson describes herself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACCIDENTS OF NATURE by Harriet McBryde Johnson
FICTION
Released: May 1, 2006

"While the story is set in a 1960s pre-ADA environment, the themes and issues are relevant today and will spark discussion, if not a clearer understanding of the struggles and successes of the disabled. (Fiction. 12+)"
At 17, Jean has lived in an able-bodied world, despite her limitations with cerebral palsy. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

GOING UNDERGROUND
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for The Shadow Cabinet (The Shades of London #3) by Maureen Johnson

Cover Story: Smoke and Mirrors

BFF Charm: Yay

Swoonworthy Scale: 6

Talky Talk: Straight Up With A Sense of Humor

Bonus Factors: Cults, Underground London

Relationship Status: Where Do You Think You’re Going?

 

Cover Story: Smoke and Mirrors

The first time I saw the new ...


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BLOG POST

ALL THE WHILE THE SLIME WAS UNDER THE BUILDING
by Sarah Pitre

 

BOOK REPORT for The Madness Underneath (Shades of London #2)  by Maureen Johnson

Cover Story: A For Effort
BFF Charm: Roger Murtaugh
Swoonworthy Scale: 4
Talky Talk: Straight Up With a Twist
Bonus Factors: Ghosts, London, Creepy Old Insane Asylum
Relationship Status: Rebound


 

Cover Story: A For Effort

We love to complain about the horrendous covers that ...


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BOOK REVIEW

I AM A WITCH'S CAT by Harriet Muncaster
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 22, 2014

"This heartwarming look at the close bond between mother and daughter stands out for its clever twist and stunningly detailed artwork. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A spunky girl who dresses up as a black cat is sure her mother is really a witch. Turn the pages to see if this is true. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY HALLOWEEN, WITCH'S CAT! by Harriet Muncaster
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2015

"This offering is more of a snack than a satisfying treat; all readers will focus on are the meticulously created pictures full of fun things they can almost reach out and touch. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Muncaster follows up I Am a Witch's Cat (2014) with another mother-daughter tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BIGGEST SMALLEST CHRISTMAS PRESENT by Harriet Muncaster
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Clementine proves the adage about good things coming in small packages. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Over several years, a Thumbelina-sized girl receives gifts from Santa that are too large for her diminutive size. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD by Harriet Ziefert
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"The potential pleasure of reading is sacrificed to pure mechanics, making basal readers look like poetry. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Ziefert and Bolam have collaborated on more felicitous projects than this clanky reworking of a familiar tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"This is not a comprehensive volume, but along with its long list of further reading, it has its place as supplementary material. (Nonfiction. 12-15)"
``You Will Wonder How I Can Bear It'' is the title of one chapter in a book that attempts to account for the women who helped settle the West, but its scope often includes almost every manner of prejudice and suffering that occurs to any people during that place and time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMES, THE CONNOISSEUR CAT by Harriet Hahn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 21, 1991

"An iffy item for the cat fancier (depends on one's whimsy quotient), and a maybe (the fine-arts milieu is rather special) as a juvenile crossover."
Like the comics Garfield or Heathcliff, the silver cat James, in this excruciatingly whimsical tale of a brainy feline, is a cat only in (what we interpret as) giant ego and vanity. Read full book review >