Search Results: "Harry Mazer"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"Timed to coincide with the anniversaries of V-J Day and the end of WWII, this conclusion to the trilogy begun with A Boy at War: A Novel of Pearl Harbor (2001) and A Boy No More (2004) will attract young history enthusiasts and be valuable in school units on the war. (Fiction. 9-14)"
The battle for Okinawa, in 1945, was the last major battle of WWII, and Adam Pelko enlisted just in time to be there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BOY AT WAR by Harry Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"Mazer's afterword on Pearl Harbor contains information about the Japanese in America at that time, but unfortunately his story does not effectively involve the reader with the requisite emotional intensity or dramatic narrative. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
In November of 1941, Adam Pelko is in yet another new high school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Mazer ends with a sobering list of statistics and sources of more information. (Short stories. 12-14)"
From an impressive list of contributors, Mazer (The Last Mission, 1979) gathers a dozen short stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BROTHER ABE by Harry Mazer
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 6, 2009

Well timed to catch the wave of interest that's likely to rise for the bicentennial of Lincoln's birth, this historical tale zeroes in on the personalities of ten-year-old Abe, his mother Nancy and his father Thomas—all as seen through the eyes of his sister Sally, two years his senior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BOY NO MORE by Harry Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"But under the weight of his family, work, school, and a tentative romance with a slightly older girl, the core and newly resonant issue of knowing when and if loyalty to friend and country contradict, loses its focus and urgency. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In wartime, should a person help a friend whose parents are immigrants from an enemy nation? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO IS EDDIE LEONARD? by Harry Mazer
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Still, entertaining; but for a deeper and more astute, look at this theme, try Alcock's taut The Cuckoo Sister (1986). (Fiction. 12-16)"
Shortly after the death of the grandmother who raised him, Eddie—who knows no other family save an uncle who once gave him a dog, then took it away, and who has since disappeared—sees a notice about Jason Diaz, missing since the age of three. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WILD KID by Harry Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"An exciting, unusual survival story, very well told. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 10-14)"
When 12-year-old Sammy, who has Down's syndrome, gets lost (while he chases after his stolen bike and its rider, he climbs on the back of a truck and winds up miles from home), he encounters Kevin, a runaway who has been living on his own in the forest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIGHT DAYS, STUPID NIGHTS by Norma Fox Mazer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Better-than- average light fare. (Fiction. 11-15)"
Two prolific, reliable YA authors set a knotty contemporary issue—privacy vs. the right to know—in an accessible story about four teens, summer interns on a small-town paper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 7, 2012

"As illuminating as a hand grenade, and just as powerful. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Ben Bright's senior year seems a prelude to a gloriously successful life, with college, loving girlfriend and an acting career spread out in front of him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRY HARRISON! HARRY HARRISON! by Harry Harrison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Science-fiction readers and Harrison devotees will garner the most pleasure from this heartfelt autobiography."
The life and 60-year career of an award-winning science-fiction writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Overall, a solid-enough introduction to Houdini; good escapist reading that should lead to more. (source notes, index) (Biography. 8-12)"
Ehrich Weiss was born in Budapest and died Harry Houdini in Detroit, having lived a rags-to-riches story that was inescapably magical. Read full book review >