Search Results: "Hasia R. Diner"


BOOK REVIEW

LOWER EAST SIDE MEMORIES by Hasia R. Diner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Admirably researched, this offers a perceptive revisionist analysis of American Jewry's most distinctive former address."
A provocative account of how the Lower East Side of New York became a mythical citation in the American Jewish narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2009

"A work of towering research and conviction that will surely enliven academic debates for years to come."
Diner (American Jewish History/New York Univ.; The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000, 2004, etc.) hurls a passionate, well-delineated attack on the conventional view that postwar Jews and survivors wanted to forget the Holocaust rather than memorialize the tragedy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Sobering and useful."
While covering no especially new ground, Diner (History/George Mason Univ.) compiles a cohesive look at one of the most change-filled eras in American history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF GENESIS ILLUSTRATED by R. Crumb
Released: Oct. 19, 2009

"An erudite and artful, though frustratingly restrained, look at Old Testament stories."
The Book of Genesis as imagined by a veteran voice of underground comics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Eye of God by R. Thomas
NON-FICTION

"A regularly affecting but discombobulated collage of reflections and hypotheses."
Thomas offers a debut, book-length essay on the spirit world and life after death. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

TRUE GRIT
by Myra Forsberg

Classic Western figures like John Wayne’s stubborn cattle rancher in Howard Hawks’ Red River, Lorne Greene’s stirring patriarch in Bonanza, and James Arness’ laconic Marshal Matt Dillon in Gunsmoke galvanize the big and small screens. But this genre’s books also offer plenty of intense characters to savor. Kirkus Indie recently reviewed two Western novels and a novella filled with bracing ...


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BOOK REVIEW

WHOSE SHOES? by Stephen R. Swinburne
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"EWSLUGp1991, but as that work is out of print, this will substitute nicely. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Firefighter, chef, mail carrier, ballerina, clown, farmer, soccer player, National Guard soldier and construction worker are depicted through their footwear in this photo essay that asks the title question over and over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT’S OPPOSITE? by Stephen R. Swinburne
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The opening page, of two feet, one clad in a tie-dyed sock and one with its little toes each painted a different color, and the last shot, of a tiny baby hand atop an adult one, bookend the images with an opposite of their own. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A photo essay in candy-bright colors that does better with its defining visuals than its text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHARK KING by R. Kikuo Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"A myth involving rampant anthropophagy transformed into a lightly sketched tale of parent-child bonding. (Graphic folktale. 7-9)"
The Shark King's deadly son gets an extreme makeover in this version of a traditional tale from Hawaii. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOUSETROPOLIS by R. Gregory Christie
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A welcome addition to any folk-tale collection, this clever retelling and its warm, embracing illustrations demonstrate the enduring appeal of this classic tale. (Picture book/folk tale. 4-8)"
A 21st-century update to Aesop's enduring fable finds cousins City Mouse and Country Mouse spending time in each other's locale to realize that they both prefer life at home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: July 7, 2007

"The characters, Septina in particular, are not likable, the plot twists are bizarre instead of interesting and the attempts at cleverness and humor, though occasionally right on, are for the most part overdone and forced. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Fishbone presents this middle-grade reader in the form of letters from purple-haired Septina Nash—the magical seventh child of a seventh child of a seventh child—to her teachers, her school counselor and the police lieutenant who is leading the investigation into the disappearance of Sexta, Septina's sister. Read full book review >