Search Results: "Hazel Grange"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1996

"Still, there is plenty to be learned about a time when hard work did have its rewards and when couples stayed together through hardships and disagreements; and animal lovers, especially, will find delight in Grange's memoirs."
The hardworking and long-suffering wife of an early Wisconsin ecologist delivers an impressive if occasionally long-winded account of economic survival and ecological commitment during the Depression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ELEPHANT’S TRUNK by Hazel Lincoln
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"An especially great resource for diverse classrooms that include special-needs children. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A delightful tale about animal adaptations, being comfortable in the skin you're in and learning how your body works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE DUCK by Hazel Hutchins
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"It's a fleeting episode, engrossingly tense, laced with a little natural history, and finished off by a not entirely predictable outcome. (Picture book. 6-8)"
One Duck (32 pp.; $18.95; $6.95 paper; Sept.; 1-55037-561-X; paper 1-55037-560-1): A mother duck nestles down in a field atop twelve eggs, a farmer fires up the tractor, ready for a day's plowing, and the stage is set for a sudden, potentially tragic encounter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUSIN SUSANNAH by Hazel Hucker
Released: Feb. 14, 1996

An irrepressible heroine elevates a predictable storyline in this British novelist's American debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MRS. MALORY: DEATH OF A DEAN by Hazel Holt
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"A delectable treat for cozy lovers, British style."
Once again, Sheila Malory, the village of Taviscombe's favorite widow (unable to say no to any request for a favor), is helping the inept, not to say inert, local police with their inquiries—this time in a murder case that hits close to home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRUELLEST MONTH by Hazel Holt
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 22, 1991

"Not as complicated as the author may have intended, but one of the world's great libraries is always worth a visit."
Bland Sheila Malory (the widow heroine of Mrs. Malory Investigates) settles her son in at Oxford, then retires to the Bodleian Library, arguably the nicest setting a mystery could have, to research an article on little-known Victorian authors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2011

"A highly readable journey of one man's renewed lease on life."
Debut memoir of a man's discovery of spiritual rejuvenation while hiking Bhutan's daunting Snowman Trek. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOBY by Hazel Mitchell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Toby is a pleasing pup, but his story doesn't stand out from the crowded pack of dog tales. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-7)"
A timid rescue dog learns to get along with his new owners, a lonely boy and his single dad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNAP! by Hazel Hutchins
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A beautifully humorous ode to both pragmatism and imagination. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Evan learns a lot about life in general and colors in particular as his new set of crayons ages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT ON EARTH...? by Hazel Townson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1991

"Neither as subtle nor as neatly structured as Burningham's book, but Rees has an agile, witty pen and kids are sure to enjoy the mayhem. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In the tradition of Burningham's Come Away from the Water, Shirley (1977), Dad complains about Laura's uproarious behavior, pictured on left-hand pages, while her parallel imaginary adventures are shown on the right: deep-sea diving, riding a magic carpet, scaling a mountain, etc. In a neat reversal, returning Mom blames Dad for the mess, while Laura's last adventure just may be for real. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"While often overly detailed and at times academic, her autobiography does provide an intimate record of our times and of the ongoing issues that challenge us to define ourselves over and over again."
The translation of Sartre's Being and Nothingness into English in 1955 was the first and perhaps most notable achievement of Barnes's long and scholarly career, on which she reflects in this autobiography. Read full book review >