Search Results: "Heather Cocks"


BOOK REVIEW

MESSY by Heather Cocks
Released: June 5, 2012

"For most of the lowlife celebrities skewered, fame will be justly fleeting, but this novel should have a longer shelf life, thanks to a cast of complex characters who offer ample evidence that, F. Scott Fitzgerald notwithstanding, the rich and famous are like you and me. (Fiction. 15 & up)"
Sisters Brooke (budding Tinseltown diva) and Molly (level-headed Midwesterner) return, along with Brick Berlin, their self-absorbed, dimly sweet megastar dad, in a companion piece to Spoiled (2011), gleefully sending up celebrity blogs and social networking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPOILED by Heather Cocks
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 2011

"Names aren't so much dropped as smashed; for maximum enjoyment, less-invested readers may require a 'who's who' of trashy celebrities. (Fiction. 13 & up)"
Brooke Berlin—accomplished power shopper, prima-donna-in-training and daughter of film megastar Brick Berlin—thought she was an only child. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROYAL WE by Heather Cocks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 2015

"Pages of biting humor and breathtaking glamour rewrite a fairy tale into something more satisfying than a stack of tabloids."
Fashion bloggers Cocks and Morgan (Spoiled, 2011, etc.) debunk the princess fantasy in a fictional tell-all inspired by the courtship of Kate Middleton and Prince William.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"A powerful cultural analysis. (b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Wucker's first book is a richly textured social history of Hispaniola. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PIG CALLED HEATHER by Harry Oulton
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2015

"Stocked with flashes of wit, unlikely twists and narrow escapes from capture, this amiable ramble slides smoothly into the literary sty occupied by Wilbur, Babe, Mercy Watson and like talented porkers. (Animal fantasy. 8-10)"
When her "[b]est two-legged friend" moves away to London from a farm in Scotland, Heather follows—earning national celebrity on the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 18, 1972

"Each offers a sharp if fleeting glimpse of a different culture, but it is the reality of the settings and not the unremarkable plots that must sustain Ms. Sutcliff's considerable reputation."
Three of Rosemary Sutcliff's carefully crafted recreations of ancient times, generally less compelling than her full-length works though they exemplify the same seemingly effortless blend of story and setting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEATHER FELL IN THE WATER by Doug MacLeod
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2013

"It's hard to say whether this might convince fearful children that the water is their friend, but its sly attitude is definitely amusing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Young Heather experiences an interesting relationship with water in this slightly offbeat tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HEATHER BLAZING by Colm Tóibín
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"But, no, the moment passes—another in a series of missed opportunities that doom the novel."
Tóibín's debut (The South, 1991) followed its heroine, a married Irishwoman on the lam, through a cycle of gain and loss; his downbeat second novel, the portrait of a Dublin judge, is all loss, no gain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEATHER, THE TOTALITY by Matthew Weiner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 7, 2017

"The creator of Mad Men makes his fiction debut with a noirish novella designed to be read in one hair-raising session."
The difficulties created for a Manhattan family by the renovation of the apartment upstairs include a homicidal stalker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEATHER HAS TWO MOMMIES by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 24, 2015

"Welcome back to Heather and her mommies. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Heather has two mommiesand a new look!Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PANIC by Lauren Oliver
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 4, 2014

"The only thing more terrifying than the game itself is not getting the chance to play it. (Thriller. 14 & up)"
Oliver makes a white-knuckle return to realism that will have readers up until the wee hours. Read full book review >